Town of Winnipeg

[under construction]

Residents of the Town of Winnipeg in 1870, who were represented

~~~

Canada Flag over Schultz's Store 1869 Illustrated News

Alexander Jamieson Russell, illustration, “Town of Winnipeg,” Canadian Illustrated News 1 (Saturday, 18 December 1869), 101, the view from the North Gate of Upper Fort Garry, showing the Canadian Party flag flying in front of  Schultz’s drugstore and boarding house (the large two-storey building depicted on the right). See also Alex. J. Russell, The Red River Country, Hudson’s Bay & North-West Territories considered in relation to Canada (Montreal: G. E. Desbarats, 1870), 8-9.

On 27 November 1869, the second day of a meeting held at Emmerling‘s Hotel in the Town of Winnipeg, a motion was put and carried that defined the boundaries of the town. Winnipeg extended “as far as but not inclusive of Fort Garry on the South, as far as Mr. Alexander Logan’s on the north, as far as the Red River on the east and two miles out on the plains from the river on the west side.”

[Alexander BeggAlexander Begg’s Red River journal: and other papers relative to the Red River resistance of 1869-1870, ed. W.L. Morton (Toronto: Champlain Society, 1956), 186, 187.]

On or about 11-12 February 1870, Alfred H. Scott and Hugh Francis Olone circulated a petition in the town asking for representation in the Legislative Assembly of the Provisional Government (recently established by vote of The Convention of Forty/ La Grande Convention). They wanted Winnipeg to be made a constituency separate from the parish of St. John’s. On or about 12 February Scott and Olone presented their petition to President Louis Riel (also appointed by the Convention, and now in charge of governance, along with his executive council).

By 2 March 1870, Scott and Olone’s requested change had been approved by the President and Council. The plan previously devised during the The Convention of Forty, calling for a legislative assembly of twenty-four elected representatives, was therefore modified. Two additional councillors were to be elected to represent Winnipeg. But, increasing the number of electoral ridings in the settlement by one and bringing the total number of representatives up to twenty-six would mean that the legislative assembly would have fourteen nominally ‘English’ councillors and only twelve who were nominally ‘French.’ The problem was addressed and balance maintained by allowing for two additional councillors from the French parishes. Thus the number of members required for the legislative assembly was finalized at a total of twenty-eight.

[Norma Hall, with Clifford P. Hall, and Erin Verrier, A History of the Legislative Assembly of Assiniboia/le Consiel du Gouvernement Provisoire (Winnipeg:  Manitoba, Department of Aboriginal and Northern Affairs, 2010), 6.]

The New Nation dated 4 March 1870 (but apparently printed on the 5th) carried a notice that the Provisional Government had officially designated Winnipeg to be the capital of the North-west.

 winnipeg the capital

“Official Orders,” New Nation (4 March 1870), 2.

The boundaries of the town were now defined by “The Assiniboine River on the South; Red River on the East; McDermott’s Creek on the North; and on the West by Spence’s Creek.” The latter western boundary was also known as Colony Creek and ran beside James Spence’s gristmill.

The placement of the southern boundary meant servants of the Hudson’s Bay Company who maintained households in Upper Fort Garry were included within the Winnipeg riding as constituents with representation in the legislative assembly of the Provisional Government (which would be named the Legislative Assembly of Assiniboia on 18 March 1870).

The placement of the northern boundary meant that the people residing to the north of McDermott’s creek (running between lots that had originally belonged to Andrew McDermott and James Sinclair), most of whom lived in Point Douglas, which previously had fallen within the boundaries of the Winnipeg riding, were now counted as constituents of the riding known as St. John’s Parish.

For the Archibald Census of 1870 the northern Winnipeg boundary reverted, so that people of Point Douglas were once again listed as residents of Winnipeg, not St. John’s. In addition, by the time the census was taken in October a number of people — whether associated with the Provisional Government or opposed to it — had left the new province of Manitoba so were not counted as having resided there on 15 July 1870. The first list below, based on the census, therefore represents an initial ‘best guess’ reconstruction of the ‘householder’ population of the Town of Winnipeg during the Resistance.

See Library and Archives Canada”How the Census was Collected.”

See also:

There were additional residents present, however, who were not counted in the Archibald census. They are represented in the second list below. First Nations people had long had a presence at the Town of Winnipeg, there being a traditional camp at The Forks in the vicinity of Upper Fort Garry. The census did not record their presence because it was designed:

“to enable the lieutenant-Governor [Adams George Archibald] to ascertain the number of persons who come within the designation of ‘Families of half-breeds,’ mentioned in the 31st clause of the Manitoba Act, with a view to the division among those who come under that designation, of certain un-granted lands of the Province.”

At the time, Archibald considered the First Nations as sovereign. Until they agreed to enter a treaty with Canada, their lands could not be counted as co-extensive with the Red River Settlement or as available for settlement by outsiders (though newcomer Canadians had staked claims on unceded lands as early as 1868). The Selkirk Treaty of 1817 had covered the land adjacent to The Forks where Winnipeg and Upper Fort Garry stood, but First Nations considered this to be more like a concession granted to settle on land to which they still held title — not a complete give-away. Treaty 1 of 1870 re-addressed the issue of First Nations title. The Fort Garry Band — principally Anishinaabe people who inhabited that area, but as well had connections south to the international boundary and north to the Brokenhead settlement — were signatory to that treaty, under the leadership of Na-sha-ke-penais. Some of the Band member names were recorded in the Treaty 1 Paysheet of 1875 (in most instances, however, only the male head of a family is named — wives and children are mainly anonymous). The names are included below under a separate heading, to give an indication of the number of First Nations people who counted Upper Fort Garry and environs as home [The 1875 paysheet is used because that is the earliest I have managed to locate online. See also Pointe Coupée for names associated with the Pembina Band]).

_______________________________________________________

River Lot #.                 Individuals and Heads of Families, listed with Wives,

          and listed with Children in household (by ages) 

[and ID# from D.N. Sprague and R.P. Frye, The genealogy of the first Metis nation: the development and dispersal of the Red River Settlement, 1820-1900 (Winnipeg: Peguis, 1983).]

[numbered links are to the Archibald census of 1870]

_______________________________________________________

Upper Fort Garry

Dr. William Cowan. (Scottish, born 1818) married Harriet Goldsmith Sinclair (Métis, born 1832 to #4381 James Sinclair and Elizabeth Maria Bird)

– John 17, Anna Maria 15, Harriet Mary 10, and Alexander _

[#869]

Harriet lived with her husband and youngest child inside the fort during the Resistance of 1869-1870, while the older children were away at school in England.

Upper Fort Garry

HBC Gov. William Mactavish (Scottish, born 1815) 21st Chief of Clan Mactavish, and a Hudson’s Bay Company [HBC] servant from 1833 and Governor of Assiniboia from 1858 to 1869, he married Mary Sarah ‘Sally’ McDermott  (Métis, born 1824 to #3304 Andrew McDermott and Sarah McNab; RC)

– James William 9, Mary Letitia 8, Florence Anne 8, Andrew Dugald 4.

[#3568]

Upper Fort Garry

Joseph James Hargrave (Non-aboriginal, born 1841 to James Hargrave and Letitia Mactavish)

Nephew of the HBC Governor and first lady at Upper Fort Garry.

Upper Fort Garry

John Henry ‘Jack’ McTavish (Canadian, born 1837; RC) married Sophia Rowand (Métis, born to John Rowand and Lisette/ Louise/ ‘Shining Star’ Humphraville/ Ompherville/ Umphreville — aka Josephte Belly/ Boshue/ du Boishue dit Berland/ Breland; RC)

– Margaret Marie ‘Maggie’ 5, George Taché 3.

J.H. McTavish was unrelated to the HBC Governor and first lady at Upper Fort Garry — though two of their children eventually married; Sophia’s sister, Margaret Rowand, was married to Hon. James McKay, St. James, of the legislative Assembly of Assiniboia.

Upper Fort Garry

J.E. [Norbert] Gay (of France)

Arrived January 1870; departed August 1870. Appointed Col.-Commandant of the Provisional Government of Assiniboia’s military force. See The Military/ Settlement Guard.

_______________________________________________________

[?]

George ‘Dutch George’ Emmerling (Bavarian, born 1827) married Emilie Mager/ Major (German, born 1834)

[#1209]

George Emmerling arrived at Red River c.1862 by way of the U.S.; proprietor of Emmerling’s Hotel. Emilie Mager was the sister of Victor Mager. The Emmerlings either lived across the river in St. Boniface Parish, or appear sold their hotel and moved across the river to St. Boniface sometime in the spring to autumn of 1870.

[?]

Sheriff of Assiniboia and Governor of the Gaol, Henry McKenney (Upper Canadian, born 1826 to Henry McKenney and Elizabeth Reily/ Riley) married Lucy Stockwell (Upper Canadian)

– Augustus Joseph 24 married Catherine/ Nancy Settee (Métis, born 1857 to #2917 Rev. James Settee and Sarah Cook); Lucy 23 married Linus Romulus Bently; #3419 John 21 [married [60] Isabella Linklater (born 1847 to #2969 Magnus Linklater and Jane Flett)]; George 19; Jessie 15.

McKenney's daughter

married

Proprietors of a general goods store. Henry McKenney was a half-brother of John Christian Schultz (below).

[?]

R.H. McLaughlin (Usonian, born to Robert McLaughlin and an unidentified woman).

Proprietor of a photography studio and gallery; possibly an in-law of Hon. Hugh Francis ‘Bob’ Olone.

[?]

Hon. Hugh Francis ‘Bob’ Olone (Usonian, born 1836 to James Olone and Margaret).

first fire dept

Importer of liquor and tobacco products; proprietor of Olone’s Saloon; founding member of the town’s first fire brigade.

[?]

Hon. Alfred H. Scott (Englander, born c. 1840)

May have worked at, or lived at, Hugh Francis ‘Bob’ Olone’s Saloon.

[?]

Jeremiah C. Kennedy

J.C. Kennedy

Gunsmith; arrived at Red River in July 1868 from St. Cloud U.S. (on the advice of Bishop Grandin and William B. O’Donoghue), where he had worked from c. 1867; set up shop “Next door to the photography gallery,” town of Winnipeg. In most histories assumed to be a Usonian, but had possibly recently migrated from Ireland. Affiliated with the Resistance “from the first symptoms of opposition to the proposed policy of the Canadian Government.” Acted as Armorer to the Provisional Government, and scout in the Red River Cavalry. [See The Military/ Settlement Guard, this site; and Jeremiah C. Kennedy, affidavit, quoted in “Professor O’Donoghue,” Toronto ON Irish Canadian (30 May 1877), 1.]

[?]

James ‘Jimmy from Cork’ McCarthy (Usonian)

Reputed to be a ‘character’ and cantankerous; arrived at Red River from Fort Edmonton c.1866 with Father Albert Lacombe. See St. Vincent Memories http://56755.blogspot.ca/2011/03/troop-socials.html.

[?]

American Consul in Winnipeg, Jürgen Christopher Oscar ‘George’ Malmros (German Usonian, born 1826 to Georg Malmros and Anna Catherina Augusta Jennsen)

Supporter of annexation of Rupert’s Land to the U.S.; resigned in March when recalled to Washington D.C. to be made United States Consul for Pictou, Nova Scotia (1870 to 1881).

_______________________________________________________

[1?]

[1-3] Methodist minister, Rev. George Young (Upper Canadian, born 1821 to George Young and Mary Platt) married Mary Alsy Holmes (Upper Canadian, born 1821)

– George H. Young 20.

_______________________________________________________

2

[4-5] John Christian Schultz (Upper Canadian, born 1839 to William Ludwig Schultz and Elizabeth Reily/ Riley McKenney) married Agnes Campbell Farquharson (Scottish, born c.1840 to James Farquharson and an unidentified woman; RC).

[#4755]

The Schultzs ran a drugstore and boarding house; John C. Schultz claimed to be a medical doctor, but was not certified or licensed; he was one of the leaders of the Canadian Party.

2-4

[6] James Farquharson (Scottish West-Indian, born 1820 to William Farquharson and an unidentified woman)

[#1502]

2-4

[7-9] Patric Gammie Laurie (Scottish, born 1832 to William Laurie and an unidentified woman) married Margaret Carney (Upper Canadian, born 1834 to Richard Carney and an unidentified woman)

– William 15.

[#1084]

Printer and Canadian Party member. Arrived in the autumn of 1869. Printed 300 copies of William McDougall’s bogus proclamation by the “planer process.” Apparently afterwards fled the settlement, returning with Wolsely’s Red River Expeditionary Force. See J.C. Major, “Introduction,” The Red River Expedition (1870).

2-4

[10] G. Ellwood (Usonian, born 1809 to John Ellwood and an unidentified woman)

[#27404]

2-4

[11-12] Hugh S. Donaldson (Lower Canadian, born 1831 to William Donaldson and an unidentified woman) married Margaret Harriott Rowand (Métis, born 1830 to John Edward Harriott and Elizabeth Pruden)

– [13] Edward Rowand 6 (Métis, son of John Rowand Jr.)

[#1192]

The Donaldson’s operated a “Book; Stationery, Fancy and Toy line of business,” along with running a lending library. Hugh was appointed captain in the Patriot Army/ Red River Cavalry of the Provisional Government in response to rumours circulating by late November 1869 that ‘the Sioux’ posed a threat to the settlement. See “The Sioux! Winnipeg in Arms! The First Appearance of the Canadian Allies,” New Nation(7 January 1870), 2. Margaret Harriott’s first husband ( John Rowand Jr., deceased) was brother to Sophia Rowand McTavish who lived at Upper Fort Garry, and brother to Margaret Rowand McKay married to Hon. James McKay, St. James of the Legislative Assembly of Assiniboia.

2-4

[14] ‘Major’ Henry Martin Robinson (Usonian, born 1845 to John Robinson and an unidentified woman)

h.m. robinson

[#4205]

Appointed 2d Lieutenant in the Provisional Government of Assiniboia’s settlement guard in late November; publisher and editor of the New Nation newspaper from mid-December 1869 to about 18 March 1870 when he replaced Oscar Malmros as American Consul. See The Military/ Settlement Guard and Red River Newspaper Chronology and the men who ‘made’ the news, this site.

2-4

[15-17] Brian Devlyne/ Devlin (Irish, born 1819 to Brian Devlyne and an unidentified woman) married Jane Fade [sic] (Irish, born 1824 to Edward Fade [sic: Fehr?] and an unidentified woman)

– William Devlyne 18.

[#1135]

“An army pensioner, who had taken his discharge from the Royal Canadian Regiment when they left Fort Garry in 1861”; owners/ proprietors of Devlin’s, a restaurant and hotel. See Isaac Cowie, Company of Adventures (1913), 155; reference in advertisement New Nation (21 January 1870); and George F. Reynolds, “The man who created Portage and Main,” http://www.mhs.mb.ca/docs/transactions/3/portageandmain.shtml.

2-4

[18-19] Daniel ‘Dan’ Deolyne/ Devlin (Non-Aboriginal, born 1847 to #1135 Bryan Devlin and Jane Fade [Fehr?]) married Margaret Anderson (Métis, born 1845 to #95 William Anderson and Nancy Saunders)

[#1138]

Dan worked as a clerk at Bannatyne and Begg’s store. See Isaac Cowie, Company of Adventurers, 155.

Academy St. Mary’s

[20] Sister Celine Allard (Lower Canadian, born 1843 to Charles Allard and an unidentified woman; RC)

[21] Sister Mary Jane Adélaide Macdougall  (Métis, born 1844 to John George McDougall and Jane/ Jennie/ Genevieve Vandersluys Jasper/ Jaspard/ Gaspard; RC)

Sister Marie-Xavier/ Marguerite Dunn (Newfoundlander, born 1837; RC)

Sister Malvina Colette (Lower Canadian, born 1838; RC)

– “9 boys. 11 girls”

– [22] Sara Lanety/ Lavety/ Larety 17 (Métis, born in the U.S. to Thomas Lanety/ Lavety / Larety and an unidentified woman)

– [23] William S. Morrick 11 (Sioux/ Métis, born in the U.S.)

The sisters held voting privileges, see Consideration of the political position of Women during the Resistance, this site.

2-4

[24] George Roy (Lower Canadian, born 1847 to Theophile Roy and an unidentified woman)

[#4233]

[2-4?]

[25-28] Joseph Crowsen/ Crawsen (Englander, born 1835 to Henry Crowsen and an unidentified woman) married Harriet Caussell (Englander, born 1834 to John Caussell and an unidentified woman)

– Elisa 13, Susan Lillian 10.

Canadian Party sympathizers, see W.J. Healy, Women of Red River (1923), 82, for reference to Harriett Caussell Crowson.

2-4

[29] Albert Sargent (Usonian, born 1826 to Morris Sargent and an unidentified woman) [married Caroline Pruden Sinclair (Métis, born 1830) after the death in 1870 of her husband, #4384 & #4389 Thomas Sinclair Sr.]

[#4311]

2-4

[30] Henry Moncrief/ Moncriff (Shetlander, born 1837 to Robert Moncriff)

[#2759]

Employee at the HBC Store in the Town of Winnipeg [See Isaac Cowie, Company of Adventurers, 155]

2-4

[31-32] James Mulligan (Irish, born 1814 to Edward Mulligan and an unidentified woman) married Catherine McGee (Englander, born 1824 to E. McGee; RC)

– [33-42] James F. 30, George P. 22, Robert P. 20, Elizabeth 18, Edward A. 16, Harriet 15, Alex 14, Mary J. 8, Agnes 6, William H. 5.

[#1709]

See Prisoners, this site. See also W.J. Healy, Women of Red River (1923), 83, for description of one of Mulligan’s daughter’s experience while visiting her father in gaol; and “The Liquor Laws,” in “Council of Assiniboia,” Nor’-Wester (28 December 1859), for a reference to Mulligan’s early attempt to peddle liquor.

_______________________________________________________

2-7

[1778-1779] Francois Boudreau (Lower Canadian, born 1814 to Francois Boudreau and Marguerite Labreche; RC) married Emelie Aubuchon (Métis, born 1824 to #143 Pierre Aubuchon and Marie Daze; RC)

– [1780-1787] (but missing 1784) Baptiste 17, Pierre 20, Francoise 13, Rosalie 11, Philomene 10, Antoine 6, Joseph 5.

[#451]

2-7

[1788-1790] Francois Gingras (Métis, born 1842 to #1963 Antoine Blanc Gingras and Scholastique Trottier; RC) married Anne ‘Annie’ McMurray (Métis, born 1844 to William McMurray and Ann ‘Annie’ Christie Nancy Ballenden; RC)

– William 4, James C. 1.

[#1962]

Supporters of the Provisional Government.

2-7

[1791] James Dawson (Englander, born 1844 to Robert Dawson and an unidentified woman)

[#1048]

See Prisoners, this site.

2-7

[1792] James Jeffrys

[#2344]

2-7 [St. John’s?]

[1793-1794] Charles Swan (Métis, born 1824 to Charles Swan and an unidentified woman) married Margaret Hay (Métis, born 1815 to Henimon? Hay)

[sic: #4560 Charles Swain (Métis, born 1813 to #4561 Charles Swain and Margaret) married Margaret Hay (Métis, born 1817)?]

_______________________________________________________

4

[43] William Drever Sr. (Scottish, born 1802) married Helen Rothney (born, 1811 to James Drever and an unidentified woman) married    (born; died 1866)

[44-45] – Mary Jane 17, Christian C. 15.

[#1311]

_______________________________________________________

4-14

[46-48] William Drever Jr. (Non-Aboriginal, born 1844 to #1311 William Drever Sr. and Helen Rothney) married Jane Elizabeth Hill/ Still (Upper Canadian, born 1845 to Charle J. Hill)

– Frances Helen 2.

[#1312]

See Prisoners, this site.

[4-14?]

[49] Alex McPherson (Scotland, born 1837 to John McPherson)

[4-14?]

[50] W.H. Cosgrove (Usonian, born 1842 to A. Cosgrove and an unidentified woman)

Cosgrove and Lennon

Cosgrove and Olone

Businessman, sometime partner in the saloon ventures of John Lennon Sr. and Hugh F. Olone.

_______________________________________________________

4-13

[51-55] A.R. Gerald (Usonian, born 1830 Owen Gerald and an unidentified woman) married Mary J. Armstrong (Englander, born 1844 to James Armstrong and an unidentified woman)

– Ellen 5, J.A. 3, Mary L. 1.

[#1901]

 Opened a butcher shop by 1871.

4-13

[56] William Spice (Englander, born 1825 to William Spice and an unidentified woman)

[#4850]

See Prisoners, this site.

4-13

[57] Alexander ‘Alex’ McArthur (Scottish, born 1825 to William McArthur and an unidentified woman)

[#3268]

See Prisoners, this site.

4-13

[6165] James Stewart (Scottish, born 1827 to William Stewart and an unidentified woman) married Robina McKay (Scottish, born 1834 to Robert McKay and Christianna Bannerman)

– Robert 14, James C. 12, Alex J. 8; and [66] Charles Murrick 9 (Métis, born in the U.S. to Andrew Murrick and an unidentified woman).

[#4488]

See Prisoners, this site.

4-13

[67] John H. Robertson (New Brunswicker, born 1841 to William Robertson and an unidentified woman)

[#4083]

4-13

[68] Robert Holland (Upper Canadian, born 1828 to Robert Holland and an unidentified woman)

[#2170]

See Prisoners, this site.

4-13

[69] James Robb (Usonian, born 1845 to Charles Robb and an unidentified woman)

[#4154]

See Prisoners, this site. https://www.google.ca/webhp?hl=en&tab=ww

4-13

[70] Lewis William Archibald (Nova Scotian, born 1836 to John Archibald and Catherine Murdoch)

[#106]

See Prisoners, this site. Related to Adams George Archibald, who was afterwards appointed the first Lieutenant Governor of Manitoba.

4-13

[71-72] Robert Atkinson Davis (Lower Canadian, born 1839 to Thomas Davis and Anna Urania Chaffee) married Susan Augusta True (Usonian, born 1847 to S. True and an unidentified woman)

[#895]

Arrived at Red River on 10 May 1870. In September they bought George Emmerling’s hotel and renamed it Davis House.

4-13

[73] Angus R. Chisholm (Upper Canadian, born 1838 to Robert Chisholm and an unidentified woman)

[#793]

See Prisoners, this site.

4-13

Magnus Linklater (Orcadian, born 1820 to John Linklater and an unidentified woman; died 1868) married [58] Jane Flett (Non-Aboriginal, born 1823 to #1596 John Flett and Isabelle Murray)

– [60] Isabella 18, [59] Mary H. Linklater 16

[#2969]

4-13

George McPherson (born 1800 to Andrew McPherson and an unidentified woman) married Angelique Racette (Métis, born 1803 to Charles Racette and Josephte; died 1839)

[#3471]

_______________________________________________________

6

[111-113] Andrew McDermott (Irish, born 1793 to Miles McDermott) married Sarah Mary McNab (Métis, born 1803 to #3464 Thomas McNab and Mary Jane)

– Jane 27.

[#3304]

_______________________________________________________

6-13

[76] Henry ‘Harry’ Woodington (Lower Canadian, born 1847 to William Woodington and an unidentified woman)

[#5273]

See Prisoners, this site.

6-13

[77] William J. Porter (Irish, born 1835 to Robert Porter and an unidentified woman)

[#3967]

6-13

[78] William H. Lyon (Usonian, born 1832 to Graham Lyon and an unidentified woman)

[#2708]

6-13

[79] James Devlin (Upper Canadian, born 1848 to John Devlin and an unidentified woman)

[#1175]

See Prisoners, this site. James and Joseph Devlin became managers of The Garret House, a bar and boarding house owned by distiller Charles Garret. See advertisement, Manitoba News-Letter (19 October 1870).

6-13

[80-87] Pierre-Henri ‘Henry’ Coutu/  LaCouture (Métis/ Lower Canadian, born 1835 to Daniel LaCouture/ Coutu and Adelaide Broillet dit Bernard) married Marie Catherine Lagemonière (Métis, born 1846 to #2546 Romain Lagemonière and Marie Vaudry)

– Pierre Daniel 8, George Philias 6, Alexander Robert 4, Victor Aristide 3, William Romain 2, Elzear Joseph 1.

[#768]

The Coutu’s ran a butchery business; Marie Catherine Lagemonière Coutu was cousin to Louis Riel, President of the Provisional Government of Assiniboia.)

[6-13?]

John ‘Lemons’ Lennon Sr.

Businessman and horse fancier in the Town of Winnipeg — best known as a saloon keeper. See “Sporting Affairs,” New Nation (17 June 1870). He fathered Ellen Fraser’s child, John Lennon Jr. (see below), but seems to have deserted Red River in the summer of 1870 — the last advertisement for his saloon appeared in the 30 July edition of the New Nation. John Lennon has been confused in some histories with Edward Lennon who arrived at Winnipeg in 1871 and opened the ‘Red Saloon’ with William Cosgrove.

Lennon's

[88] Ellen Fraser (Métis, born 1849 to Hugh Fraser and an unidentified woman)

– [89] John Lennon Jr. 1.

6-13

[90-91] Archibald Francis Wright (Scottish, born 1841) married Mary Ramsay (Non-Aboriginal, born 1848 in Upper Fort Garry to soldier Robert Ramsay and an unidentified woman)

[#5274]

See Prisoners, this site. See also W.J. Healy, Women of Red River (1923), 82-83, description of Mary Ramsay Wright’s experience visiting her new husband in prison.

6-13

[92-95] Dr. John Harrison O’Donnell (Upper Canadian, born 1837 to John O’Donnell and an unidentified woman) married Hannah Routledge (Englander, born 1840)

– F.G. 9, Mary H.E. 2.

[#3738]

See Prisoners, this site.

[6-13?]

[96] Mary Fraser (Métis, born 1846 to Hugh Fraser and an unidentified woman)

6-13

[97] Onesim ‘Onis’ Monchamp (Lower Canadian, born 1834 to Hyacinth Monchamp and an unidentified woman)

[#2758]

On arrival at Red River worked for Mr. Holmes, a brewer in St. Boniface. Eventually Monchamp opened a bar in a small room on Post Office Street. See Begg, Ten Years in Winnipeg (1879) 12.

6-13

[98] Alonzo Pierpont (Nova Scotian, born 1843 to Alonzo Pierpont and an unidentified woman)

[#3591]

6-13

[99] William Chambers  (Usonian, born 1847 to John Chambers and an unidentified woman)

[#780]

6-13

[100-103] James Irvine/ Irwine R.A. (Englander/ Scottish? or Métis?, born 1817 or 1825? to James or John? Irvine and Mary?) married Matilda Ann Tait (Métis, born 1828; died 1861)

Christiana 17, Matilda Ann 13, Maria J. 11.

[#2391]

6-13

[104-105] Charles Garratt/ Garralt/ Garret (Upper Canadian/ Englander, born 1816 to John Garratt and an unidentified woman) married Sarah White (Upper Canadian, born 1817 to Ebon White)

Garratt House

Liquor distiller, operator of Garrett House, a saloon/ boarding house. Member of the Canadian Party’s Volunteer Militia (see Prisoners, this site). Described by Alexander Begg, Ten Years in Early Winnipeg (1879), 13, as “hotel-keeper, lawyer, doctor, stump orator and goodness knows what else” who “made himself notorious.” He died 1873.

[#1814]

6-13

[106] William A./ J. Davis (Upper Canadian, born 1817 to David Davis and an unidentified woman)

[#894]

See Prisoners, this site.

6-13

[107] Edward Arkland (Upper Canadian, born 1821 to James Arkland and an unidentified woman)

[#116]

6-13

[108] Charles Heath (West-Indian, born 1850 to George Heath and an unidentified woman)

[#1799]

See Prisoners, this site.

6-13

[109] James Picard (Métis, born 1837 to James Picard and an unidentified woman) married Eliza Desborne (Métis, born 1847 to Amable Desborn)

[#3589]

_______________________________________________________

7

[1769-1777] Hon. Andrew Graham Ballenden Bannatyne (Scottish, born 1830 to James Bannatyne and an unidentified woman) married Anne ‘Annie’ McDermott (Métis, born 1832 to #3304 Andrew McDermott and Sarah McNab)

– James 14, Eliza 12, Roderick 10, Laura 8, William 6, Robert 3, Annie 1.

[#179]

_______________________________________________________

13

[74-75] John Higgins (Irish, born 1825 to Thomas Higgins) married Margaret Cook (Métis, born 1846; died 1870)

John Thomas 1.

[#2182]

_______________________________________________________

Fort Garry Band, 1875

[?]

No. 41. Baptiste Abraham/ Kewopetung, married to an unidentified woman.

[?]

No. 52. Acsenspenais[?], married to an unidentified woman.

– 1 son, 1 daughter.

[?]

No. 58. Ahnamuahkeemah[?] (widow).

– 3 sons.

[?]

No. 10. Ahunasquat, married to an unidentified woman.

– 2 sons, 1 daughter.

[?]

No. 11. Ahshuhayahaik (no wife listed).

[?]

No. 30. Ahpetokakeek (no description; absent?).

[?]

No. 31. Ahyakakwanis, married to an unidentified woman.

– 2 sons, 2 daughters.

[?]

No. 4. Akgenehkeshewaskung, married to an unidentified woman.

– 2 sons, 2 daughters.

[?]

No. 95. Anekapeneesekapowak[?] (no husband listed).

[?]

No. 2. Aniaweshohkempk, married to an unidentified woman.

– 1 son, 2 daughters.

[?]

No. 90. Antoine, married to an unidentified woman.

– 2 sons.

[?]

No. 94. Assaweepennis, married to an unidentified woman.

– 3 sons, 1 daughter.

[?]

No. 128. Assemahwahkahtook (widow).

– 1 son, 2 daughters.

[?]

No. 65. Assenspenaissik (no husband listed).

– 3 sons, 2 daughters.

[?]

No. 126. Ayahkookaynayas, married to two unidentified women.

– 3 sons.

[?]

No. 96. Aysance (no husband listed).

– 2 sons, 2 daughters.

[?]

No. 89. Chakaahsee, married to an unidentified woman.

– 4 sons.

[?]

No. 71. Charles, married to an unidentified woman.

– 2 sons, 2 daughters.

[?]

No. 56. Ehooweekageek[?] (widow).

– 3 sons, 1 daughter.

[?]

No. 27. Ekwahwehkeepeekook (no description; absent?).

[?]

No. 12. Foasasis[?], married to an unidentified woman.

– 1 son, 1 daughter.

[?]

No. 40. Fohpahsaheek (no description; absent?).

[?]

No.16. Hahsenekahmek[?], married to an unidentified woman.

– 1 son, 2 daughters.

[?]

No. 42. Paschal Indian, married to an unidentified woman.

– 1 son.

[?]

No. 47. Ingebown (no description; absent?).

[?]

No. 15. Kahkaykeegik[?], married to an unidentified woman.

– 4 sons, 3 daughters.

[?]

No. 104. Kahkaypet[?], married to an unidentified woman.

– 1 son.

[?]

No. 103. Kahkeepaykakpoweek (no husband listed).

– 1 daughter.

[?]

No. 48. Kahkekepenais, married to an unidentified woman.

– 1 son.

[?]

No. 98. Kahkeweepenussik[?], married to an unidentified woman.

– 1 daughter.

[?]

No. 127. Kahnaymeepenaisik (no husband listed).

– 2 other relatives.

[?]

No. 14. Kahoopohinee (widow)

– 3 sons, 1 daughter.

[?]

No. 7. Kahpakakneekook (no husband listed).

– 1 daughter.

[?]

No. 100. Kahpayahnaquahook (no husband listed).

– 3 sons.

[?]

No. 102. Kahpaykahpow (no husband listed).

– 1 son, 1 daughter.

[?]

No. 101. Kahpaytahkoos[?], married to an unidentified woman.

– 1 son, 1 daughter.

[?]

No. 32. Kahsekohkanse, married to an unidentified woman.

– 2 sons, 2 daughters.

[?]

No. 54. Kahtwnoonuk[?] (no description; absent?).

[?]

No. 97. Kahwayekahpow[?], married to an unidentified woman.

[?]

No. 29. Kakeenekapow[?] (no wife listed).

[?]

No. 6. Kapahahsasing[?], married to an unidentified woman.

[?]

No. 13. Kapayahpanting, married to an unidentified woman.

– 2 sons, 1 daughter.

[?]

No. 60. Kapayasaykik (no husband listed).

– 1 daughter.

[?]

No. 86. Kapayashmahnook[?] (no husband listed).

[?]

No. 23. Kechekapeemahenung[?], married to an unidentified woman.

[?]

No. 33. Keeweehahcunumekook (no description; absent?)’

[?]

No. 25. Eliza Kennedy (no husband listed).

– 1 son.

[?]

No. 81. Manaskakwakouep[?], married to an unidentified woman.

[?]

No. 26. Manitooshick (no description; absent?).

[?]

No. 53. Manoqnapeapas[?] (no description; absent?).

[?]

No. 82. Maysayaseekay, married to an unidentified woman.

[?]

No. 124. Meeshakeekeenoo, married to an unidentified woman.

– 2 sons, 2 daughters.

[?]

No. 8. Mesqnanik[?], married to an unidentified woman.

– 1 son, 3 daughters.

[?]

No. 17. Miskakeenos[?], married to an unidentified woman.

– 1 son.

[?]

No. 85. Miskwahahsee (“girl”).

[?]

No. 43. Mistik. (no description; absent?).

[?]

No. 49. Misqnagewape[?] (no description; absent?).

[?]

No. 57. Muskwabook[?] (widow).

– 5 sons, 2 daughters.

[?]

No. 9. Nabawash, married to an unidentified woman.

– 4 sons, 6 daughters.

[?]

No. 107. Nahtahmukaykot[?], married to an unidentified woman.

– 1 son, 2 daughters.

[?]

No. 109. Nanoondahkooggeek (no husband listed).

– 2 boys, 2 girls.

[?]

No. 28. Naohkeeseequak, married to an unidentified woman.

– 2 daughters.

[?]

No. 1. Nashakepenais, married to an unidentified woman.

– 1 son.

[?]

No. 108. Neepechay Kahpaywat[?], married to an unidentified woman.

– 2 sons, 1 daughter.

[?]

No. 110. Neeshkeegeekook (no husband listed).

– 1 daughter.

[?]

No. 46. Neshwaysik (no description; absent?).

[?]

No. 5. Newashekeejek[?], married to an unidentified woman.

[?]

No. 55. Noweguosh[?], married to an unidentified woman.

[?]

No. 44. Oapehow[?] (widow).

[?]

No. 73. Ogayquahoweemenin, married to an unidentified woman.

– 1 daughter.

[?]

No. 21. Okeymahkopmeek[?] (no husband listed).

– 1 son.

[?]

No. 62. Okeymahweemsi[?] (no description; absent?).

[?]

No. 112. Okeypaygeek (no wife listed).

[?]

No. 114. Ookahpayahseek (no husband listed).

– 1 son, 3 daughters.

[?]

No. 115. Oomeenwahkeegeekkook (no husband listed).

– 3 sons, 1 daughter.

[?]

No. 113. Ooshanemekeykook (no husband listed).

– 1 son, 2 daughters.

[?]

No. 57. Oozouwaskookenyass, married to an unidentified woman.

– 3 sons.

[?]

No.38. Oshahwopenais, married to an unidentified woman.

– 2 sons, 1 daughter.

[?]

No. 111. Osheekook (no husband listed).

[?]

No. 76. Oshequana[?] (no description; absent?).

[?]

No. 88. Osoyogeegik (no wife listed).

– 1 son, 1 daughter.

[?]

No. 118. Pahmeegaygeek, married to an unidentified woman.

– 1 son.

[?]

No. 50. Pahpahschooch (no description; absent?).

[?]

No. 117. Pahpayshseek, married to an unidentified woman.

– 1 son, 2 daughters.

[?]

No. 77. Papahqueenay, married to an unidentified woman.

– 1 son.

[?]

No. 129. (wife of) Paygeekkaygik (but no husband listed).

– 3 daughters.

[?]

No. 83. Payshanaquatape, married to an unidentified woman.

– 1 daughter.

[?]

No. 116. Pehaweekeegeekook (no husband listed).

– 2 sons, 2 daughters.

[?]

No. 91. Pekahweetanook[?] (no wife listed).

– 3 daughters.

[?]

No. 74. Penaisseahnaquat (no description; absent?).

[?]

No. 67. Penaissecaumhook[?] (no husband listed).

– 2 sons, 2 daughters.

[?]

No. 92. Penaissewahnahquah[?], married to an unidentified woman.

– 3 sons, 4 daughters,

[?]

No. 45. Sahkahkeek (no description; absent?).

[?]

No. 59. Sakatchewayaskung, married to an unidentified woman.

– 1 son, 2 daughters.

[?]

No. 22. Sakeemee (no husband listed).

– 1 daughter.

[?]

No. 78. Sanywaywayununusay[?] (no wife listed).

[?]

No. 64. Shamenowan (no wife listed).

[?]

No. 36. Shasayanse (no husband listed).

– 1 son, 1 daughter.

[?]

No. 80. Shaycenous[?], married to an unidentified woman.

[?]

No. 120. Sheenaweekeegeekook[?] (no husband listed).

– 2 daughters

[?]

No. 123. Sheshekewainse (no wife listed).

– 1 son.

[?]

No. 119. Shumahwahpeek[?] (no husband listed).

– 2 daughters.

[?]

No. 84. Sooskokaybay[?], married to an unidentified woman.

[?]

No. 79. Sugepenais (no description; absent?).

[?]

No. 68. Tagamis (no description; “absent”).

[?]

No. 70. Tahhiskotaygeekeeseenin[?] (no description; absent?).

[?]

No. 75. Tahtouise (no description; absent?).

[?]

No. 87. Takaywaysanze, married to an unidentified woman.

– 1 son.

[?]

No. 61. Takooah ah sik[?] (no husband listed).

[?]

No. 93. Ta pa say sick (widow).

– 2 sons, 1 daughter.

[?]

No. 72. Tatahkaygeequap[?] (no description; absent?).

[?]

No. 121. Taytahpeesask, married to an unidentified woman.

[?]

No. 24. Uachekewis[?; first letter should be M?], married to an unidentified woman.

– 2 sons.

[?]

No. 35. Uahsahwaskwaniue[?; first letter should be M?], married to an unidentified woman.

– 1 son, 1 daughter.

[?]

No. 37. Uamloopenais[?; first letter should be M?] (no wife listed).

– 3 sons, 4 daughters.

[?]

No. 20. Uanitoowahpes[?; first letter should be M?] (no husband listed).

– 1 son, 1 daughter.

[?]

No. 34. Ueemahskekapow[?; first letter should be M?], married to an unidentified woman.

– 3 sons.

[?]

No. 105. Ueeshakeeyanahquat[?; first letter should be M?] (no wife listed).

– 1 son, 2 daughters.

[?]

No. 3. Uesheequeeqnan[?; first letter should be M?], married to an unidentified woman.

– 2 son, 1 daughter.

[?]

No. 106. Uukoskosnayak[?; first letter should be M?] (no husband listed).

– 6 sons, 1 daughter.

[?]

No. 18. Wahcheekamung (no description; absent?).

[?]

No. 66. Wahkaykonaypeek (no husband listed).

– 2 sons, 1 daughter.

[?]

No. 125. Wahsahkaygeek, married to an unidentified woman.

– 2 sons.

[?]

No. 122. Wahyahsookquaywakeek[?] (no husband listed).

– 3 sons, 2 daughters.

[?]

No. 19. Wankaygeekook, married to two unidentified women.

– 1 son.

[?]

No. 39. Wahshahwaskookshpow, married to an unidentified woman.

– 3 sons.

[?]

No. 63. Wahwegeskopowuk[?] (no husband listed).

[?]

No. 69. Wendabebung[?], married to an unidentified woman.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: