St. Mary’s Laprairie/ Prairie Portage/ the Portage/ Portage la Prairie

[under construction]

Residents of St. Mary’s la Prairie Parish in 1870, who were represented

~~~

HBC Portage

“Old Fort of Hudson Bay Co. at Portage La Prairie, Man.,” showing garden plots (1890). Source:Geological Survey of Canada / Library and Archives Canada / PA-050893. Restrictions on use: Nil. Copyright: Expired

Beginning in 1851, twenty-five families followed John Garrioch (school-teacher and brother of William Garrioch Jr.), to relocate from Red River Settlement to the area known as Portage des Prairies — a location on the Assiniboine river where a trade route led north over the edge of Long Plain (an ancient buffalo hunting and sturgeon-drying ground) to Lac des Prairies/ Lake Manitoba.

Fleming 1858 prairie at prairie portage looking west

John Arnot Fleming, chromoxylograph, showing a view of the long prairie west of Prairie Portage, 1858. Source: Henry Youle Hind, Narrative of the Canadian Red river exploring expedition of 1857, and of the Assinniboine and Saskatchewan exploring expedition of 1858 (London: Longman Green, Longman and Roberts, 1860), 135.

Anglican Rev. William Cochran arranged for a land lease from Chief Pequakekan/ Pee-qua-kee-quah/ Pa-kwah-ki-kun for a church and cemetery, “for the price of one bushel of wheat from every settler during the chief’s lifetime.”

In 1853, Cochran established the mission station of St. Mary’s la Prairie. Work began on the construction of a church that year. It was completed in 1855 — the first Anglican church west of St. James Parish. The new parish was formalized on 9 April 1866, and William Garrioch Jr. was named a member of the vestry. (A new church was built at the Portage in 1882. The present St. Mary’s church is the third of the name.)

Fleming 1858 prairie portage

John Arnot Fleming, woodcut, “Prairie Portage,” 1858, showing a First Nations encampment near the church of St. Mary’s la Prairie (the decorated tents suggests Dakota/ Santee Sioux from south of the U.S. border — possibly visiting in connection with the Sweet Corn Treaty). Source: Henry Youle Hind, Narrative of the Canadian Red river exploring expedition of 1857, and of the Assinniboine and Saskatchewan exploring expedition of 1858 (London: Longman Green, Longman and Roberts, 1860), 145.

The Portage was home to Saulteaux/ Ojibway First Nations — Chief Pequakekan/ Pee-Qua-Kee-Quah (who had died in the 1860s) had been a son of Chief Mechkadewikonaie/ la Robe Noir/ ‘Black Robe,’ an initial signatory of the 1817 Selkirk Treaty. By 1870, however, there were also Dakota/ Santee Sioux (as many as 400 relatively new arrivals seeking refuge from U.S. government forces, and related to Saulteaux/ Ojibway from the time of the Sweat Corn Treaty of 1858). In addition, the A’aninin/ ‘White Clay People’/ ‘White Mud’ (a.k.a Gros Ventres/ ‘Big Belly’/ Piik-siik-sii-naa/ ‘Snakes’/ Serpente), had traditional ties in the region (and ancestral ties to Saulteaux/ Ojibway Anishnaabemowin-speaking peoples, being of Algic/ Algonquian origin).

First Nations people in  the area hunted and farmed — the growing of potatoes, carrots, onions, parsnips, beets, and turnips in the area was noted by 1805. They also trapped, fished, traded, and worked as artisans (such as a tinsmith), and as wage labourers with the Hudson’s Bay Company [HBC], and for neighbouring farmers in the area. The Saulteaux children had a day school at the western end of the Portage settlement, near the HBC post situated “on the summit of a pretty steep eminence in immediate proximity to the [Assiniboine] river bank.” (It was located in the vicinity of the site of La Verendrye‘s historic Fort la Reine of 1738. Another post had been built at or near the same place by the North West Company in the 1790s. The HBC had built posts, off and on, in the area from the 1790s as well, but a concerted effort to maintain a regular establishment at Portage was left until the 1830s.)

Although by 1870 members of ‘settled’ First Nations families were considered ‘civilized’ (much like the people of  ‘the Indian Settlement’/ St. Peter’s Parish — from which some of the settlers had originated), very few First Nations individuals were included in the Archibald Census of that year. The census was designed

“to enable the lieutenant-Governor [Adams George Archibald] to ascertain the number of persons who come within the designation of ‘Families of half-breeds,’ mentioned in the 31st clause of the Manitoba Act, with a view to the division among those who come under that designation, of certain un-granted lands of the Province.”

At the time, Archibald considered First Nations to be sovereign. Until they agreed to enter a treaty with Canada, their lands could not be counted as co-extensive with the Red River Settlement or as available for settlement by outsiders (though newcomer Canadians had staked claims on unceded lands as early as 1868). Treaties 1 and 2 were negotiated with First Nations (excluding Dakota) of the Portage region and outlying locales in 1871, but the terms were disputed to 1876 (and beyond). The number of First Nations individuals missed by the Archibald census, but who were considered to figure among ‘the people’ of Assiniboia during the Resistance of 1869-1870, was significant. Names compiled in the 1871 Treaty One Paysheet are included below. In 1872 the Portage La Prairie Band numbered about 425 people, in 1873 about 478 (excluding people from Whitemud — see St. Margaret’s/ High Bluff.

_______________________________________________________

River Lot #.                 Individuals and Heads of Families, listed with Spouses,

and listed with Children in household (by ages) 

[and ID# from D.N. Sprague and R.P. Frye, The genealogy of the first Metis nation: the development and dispersal of the Red River Settlement, 1820-1900 (Winnipeg: Peguis, 1983).

[Numbered links are to the Archibald census of 1870; and/ or to Library and Archives Canada (LAC), Record Group (RG) 10, C-7135, Annuity Paylist, 1871).]

_______________________________________________________

Portage Bands

[?]

Akakaya/ Akohkaya, married to an unidentified woman.

– 1 son.

[No. 1, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Ahqustook/ Ahgmstook (widow).

[No. 2, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Ahjijukoonce/ Ahchechakoonce/ Edward Tanner (Saulteaux, born 1848/ 1849 to  Kaybayway and Nahgaunahquahumo; stepson? of Peicheto/ Peichito/ Pacheetoo/ Pecheto/ Petito/ ‘Image’ / ‘Little Pheasant’/ Samuel, and/or Edward, and/or Decorby Tanner? and Nejotekoe/ Nejotekwe/ Marie Jane Ledoux?) married Anna (born 1849), and Now E Gwan/ Nowegwance/ Nowwegwonnaybequ/ Nowegaunce (born 1845)

Edward [served in the American Civil War?]; left for the U.S. “in the early 1870s”; permanently settling at Gaa-waabaabiganikaag/ ‘White Mud’/ White Earth Reservation, Minnesota, by 1880; photographed as a member of a treaty delegation which negotiated terms with the U.S. government after the Battle of Sugar Point/ Leach Lake Rebellion of 1898.

[?]

Anne ‘Annie’ (Saulteaux, ‘maiden name unknown,’ raised by William Gaddy), married “a Half-breed” Favel (who was not receiving a treaty annuity payment; deceased?)

– 2 sons.

[No. 10, Treaty 1, 2nd Payment Paysheet] Anne moved to Prince Albert c. 1880; was with the Straggler Band at Carlton c. 1878-1884. She might be Annie Gaddy married to William Favel with 4 year old son William Peter Favel (see lot no. 51-58 [308-309] below).

[?]

At-a-ka-wi-nin/ Oditagaywinin/ Otahaoman/ O-ta-ha-o-man/ ‘The Gambler’/ John Tanner (born 1842? to Peicheto/ Pecheto/ Petito/ Samuel or Edward or Decorby Tanner and perhaps Apatus; died 1916) married Kaytepaytonook/ Marie (born c. 1847?)

– James 9?, Joseph [?].

Related to, or the same individual as, At-a-ka-wi-nin/ The Gambler who was present at Portage by 1851?; served in the Union army, 9th Regiment, Minnesota Infantry, Company G, during the civil war (or was that his cousin)?; Chief at Silver Creek. [See “Silver Creek Surrender.”]

[?]

Bah-gah-mah-gun/ ‘Talking Stone’ (Saulteaux)

[Midewin]

[?]

Banaap, married to an unidentified woman.

– 5 sons, 2 daughters.

[No. 3, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Jean Baptiste Belhumeur dit Monette (Métis, born 1832 to Andre Belhumeur and Marguerite Maron; buffalo hunter) married Marie Eulalie Malaterre? and (by 1871) Marie Tanner (Métis, born 1854? to Peicheto/ Peichito/ Pacheetoo/ Pecheto/ Petito/ ‘Image’ / ‘Little Pheasant’/ Samuel, and/or Edward, and/or Decorby Tanner and Nejotekoe/ Nejotekwe/ Marie Jane Ledoux; previously married James Bone?)

Marie and Jean Baptiste Belhumeur dit Monette had children born at Maple Creek, Wood Mountain, and Fort Ellice. Marie, like her mother, eventually became a member of the Silver Creek Band of which her brother[?], The Gambler/ John Tanner, was Chief. There, Marie farmed with her husband and a daughter from at least 1886. By 1889, however, the department of Indian Affairs insisted her husband must be expelled from their house (obtained from her mother) and from reserve land.

[?]

Francois Charles, married to an unidentified woman.

– 2 sons.

[No. 4, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Joseph Deschenaux (Métis, born 1846 to Pierre Descheneaux and Josephte Courchene) married (1869) Nesho-te-koway/ Angelique Tanner (Métis, born c. 1850 to Decorby Tanner a.k.a. Peicheto/ Peichito/ Pacheetoo/ Pecheto/ Petito/ ‘Image’ / ‘Little Pheasant’/ Samuel, and/or Edward, and Nejotekoe/ Nejotekwe/ Marie Jane Ledoux)

In his deposition of 1886, Joseph Deschenaux described himself as a farmer, who was residing at Edmonton on 15 July 1870.

[?]

Francois Desjarlais, married to an unidentified woman.

– 1 son, 2 daughters.

[No. 5, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Ietepetuny[?] (no wife listed).

– 1 daughter and 4 other relatives.

[No. 6, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Iendeep[?], married to an unidentified woman.

– 2 other relatives.

[No. 7, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Kakanokuoh, married to an unidentified woman.

– 1 son, 1 daughter, 1 other relative.

[No. 19, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Kakiwates[?] married to an unidentified woman.

– 3 sons, 2 daughters.

[No. 13, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Kakeewaycome/ Thomas/ Thomas John/ Thomas Decorby Tanner (Métis, born 1820? or 1845? to Peicheto/ Peichito/ Pacheetoo/ Pecheto/ Petito/ ‘Image’ / ‘Little Pheasant’/ Samuel, and/or Edward, and/or Decorby Tanner and Apatus), married (1836?) or (1873) to Margaret Polant/ Polette)

[?]

Kakwatoosek (no wife listed).

[No. 21, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Kapetosil[?] married to an unidentified woman.

– 1 son.

[No. 11, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Kapetwaetung, married to an unidentified woman.

– 2 sons, 2 daughters.

[No. 9, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Katahkequanapeek (widow).

– 1 son, 1 daughter.

[No. 22, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Keechewees, married to an unidentified woman.

– 3 sons, 1 daughter, 2 other relatives.

[No. 8, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Keepakesekwap, married to an unidentified woman.

– 2 sons, 2 daughters.

[No. 14, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Kegonisausse[?] married to an unidentified woman.

– 5 sons, 2 daughters.

[No. 10, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Kekapayasingkisik (no wife listed)

– 4 other relatives.

[No. 17, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Kemewemiskemy, married to an unidentified woman.

– 2 sons, 1 daughter.

[No. 18, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Kes-kee-maquah/ Keshkemaquah/ ‘The Short Bear’/ ‘The Bear’ (Saulteaux, born c. 1850 to Chief Pequakekan/ Pee-qua-kee-quah/ Pa-kwah-ki-kun and an unidentified woman)

Hereditary Chief, grandson of Chief Mechkadewikonaié/ Mechudewikoraie/ Mechkaddewikonaie/ Mechkadettinnah/ Maccathy Counoye/ La Robe Noir/ ‘Black Robe,’ an initial signatory of the 1817 Selkirk Treaty (who was possibly related to Le Grande Noir at Red Lake in the U.S.).

According to some accounts, Short Bear’s great grand father was Gavion/ Gavin Bouché/ Boucher, a band leader from Red Lake (Minnesota). [See mentions from the journal of Charles Chaboillez, 1797-798, a North West Company winterer who was headquartered at the junction of the Red and Pembina Rivers and recorded information on his trade with the Chippewa (Ojibway/ Saulteux) in the area.]

[?]

Kesepaoosa, married to an unidentified woman.

– 1 son, 1 daughter.

[No. 15, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Kewatenook (widow).

– 1 son.

[No. 23, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Kewetchwawetamok (no wife listed).

– 1 son, 1 daughter.

[No. 20, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Kewetimekeskenze[?], married to an unidentified woman.

[No. 16, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Kezesewe, married to an unidentified woman.

– 1 son, 4 daughters.

[No. 12, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Kissebawisse/ Kissibiwisse

[Yellow Quill Band]

[?]

Kissoway/ Kisoway/ Kee-she-sha-way/ Kasesaway / ‘Bright Star’/ Joseph Tanner (Métis, bom 1822? to Chief Peticho Tanner and an unidentified woman; died 1893) married an unidentified sister of Yellow Quill [Equawezanse/ Sqwasis/ ‘Little Girl’?] and/or Nesko-te-koway/ Angelique Clermont (sister of Yellow Quill? a Métis descendent of French fur trader of the surname Bouron dit Clermont).

Marie Rose 2.[?]

Alexander Morris described Kissoway as a trader. He ran a cart brigade with as many as 200 carts between Red River, Pembina, and St. Paul, Minnesota, with his father and on his own account. Morris described him as a member of Yellow Quill’s Band (being related to the Chief). Morris (and others) also stated that Kissoway’s father was Pechetot (although by some accounts they were bothers).

Kissoway was a nephew of Rev. James Tanner of St. Ann’s/ Poplar Point who died at the Portage in December 1870.

Kissoway’s daughter Julie Tanner, who married John Wells Jr. at St Francois Xavier in 1869, identified her mother only as the sister of Yellow Quill. A scrip application for a Marie Tanner (born 1842) is confusing in that it identifies her father as Joseph Tanner, but by Kissoway’s father’s (or brother’s, or family) name — Petito. Her mother is listed as Angelique Clermont, a Métis woman. Kissoway’s daughter?, Marie Rose Tanner Delaronde identified her mother as Esqua-sis/ Equawezanse/ ‘Little Girl.’

[?]

Matwawanmy (no wife listed).

[No. 25, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Alexander McCorrister (no wife listed).

[No. 27, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Isabella McKay, married but “Husband absent”.

– 1 son.

[No. 26, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Metaque (no wife listed).

– 2 sons, 2 daughters, 1 other relative.

[No. 24, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Miswanyson[?], married to and unidentified woman.

– 5 sons, 2 daughters.

[No. 28, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Antoine Mousseau/ Moosoo (Métis, born 1843 to Basile Mouseau and Sawasis/ Francoise Desjarlais) married Marguerite Methway wiuwin/ Mat wa we we nin/ Roulette (born 1850 to Awaypiness and Marie Roulette)

Antoine 1.

In 1870 Antoine Jr. was born at Portage la Prairie. In 1876 Antoine Mousseau Sr. was listed with the Whitemud Band with his wife, 4 children, and a relative [his mother, Sawasis].

[?] [Whitemud?]

Basile Mouseau/ Mousseau/ Mouseaux/ Mosso/ Mooshew/ Mouso (Lower Canadian?, born 1778 to Jean Mousseau and Catherine Lavoie?; deceased?) married Sawasis/ Francoise Desjarlais (born to, or sister of, Chief Peayasis/ François Desjarlais and an unidentified woman?).

In 1876 Sawasis was listed with the Whitemud band.

[?]

Namewamekapawuk (widow).

– 1 son.

[No. 34, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Natawaskootawak (no wife listed).

[No. 33, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Natawinenees[?] married to an unidentified woman.

– 1 son, 2 daughters.

[No. 30, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Nawakamekup[?], married to an unidentified woman.

– 1 son, 2 daughters.

[No. 32, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Nawaquakapoweke (no wife listed).

– 1 daughter.

[No. 29, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Nekahnequanapu (no wife listed).

– 1 son.

[No. 35, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?] [affiliated with White Mud?]

Netah cum mi ke mung

– By 1875: married (to an unidentified woman of Short Bear’s Band) with 2 children.

[?]

Nezamekisik[?], married to an unidentified woman.

– 1 son, 4 daughters.

[No. 31, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Nooshamekook (widow).

[No. 36, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Ojibwoyquoy (married, but husband absent).

– 2 sons.

[No. 42, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Okeymonwanin (no wife listed).

[No. 44, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Okeymow, married to an unidentified woman.

– 2 sons, 2 daughters.

[No. 45, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Okegnonwackoo[?], married to an unidentified woman.

– 2 daughters.

[No. 39, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Ooshekammy (no wife listed).

– 1 daughter.

[No. 40, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Ooskanezequas[?] (widow).

[No. 43, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Osonissquawwekanikook (widow).

– 1 daughter.

[No. 41, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Yellow Quill

Sydney Prior Hall, detail of pencil sketch,”Yellow Quill,” dated 13 August 1881. Credit: Library and Archives Canada, Acc. No. 1984-45-116V
Copyright: Expired

[Chief of the Portage Band] Osgamequan/ Oo-za-we-kwun/ Ooo-sa-oo-kwon/ Bozawequare/ ‘Yellow Quill’ (Saulteaux, born 1821; died 1910), married to an unidentified woman.

– 3 sons, 3 daughters.

[No. 37, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

A buffalo hunter, whom the HBC recognized as chief when Chief Pequakekan died in the 1860s (Kes-kee-maquah/ ‘The Short Bear’ being too young at that time).

Father of Shooneyahahnuqwud/ Silver Cloud. Father of Kewesance/ Kwezanse/ Que we sans/ John Yellow Quill (born 1886).

Brother-in-law to Kee-she-sha-way/ Kissoway/ Joseph Tanner.

A variety of prairie grass was known as yellow grass/ yellow quill.

Signed Treaty 1 and signed an adhesion to Treaty 4 — the only Chief to sign two of the numbered treaties.

[?]

Ozkeenawasis[?] married to an unidentified woman.

– 1 son, 1 daughter.

[No. 38, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

[Chief] Thomas Pachito/ Peicheto/ Peichito/ Pechito/ Petchito/ Pacheetoo/ Pecheto/ Petito/ Pettitoo/ Picheito/ ‘Image’ / ‘Little Pheasant’/ Thomas Decorby, and/or Samuel, and/or Edward, and/or Decorby Tanner (Métis, born 1800/ 1802/ 1820 to Shaw-shaw-wa-ne-ba-se/ John ‘Falcon’ Tanner and Mis-kwa-bun-a-kwa/ ‘Red Sky in the Morning’ in the U.S.; died 1872), married Apatus, and (1836?) Nejotekoe/ Nejotekwe/ Marie Jane Ledoux (born to Jean-Baptiste Ledoux and Madeleine Wehashk/ Wehnashk/ Wehwashk; later married Pehtokahan/ Francois Desmarais; afterwards married Nahweecheewaykapow).

– 2 sons, and possibly daughter Anne 12.

[No. 48, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

Pechito Tanner was one of the wealthier people at Portage. His large house was described as: “the best in the settlement, and was remarkable for being the first shingled house west of Winnipeg”; and as “the great pride of Picheito and the envy of the settlers.” It was built on the bank of the horseshoe slough, where his ranch was located, on the west side of the Portage Settlement, near the main road.

He had additional children (there were 5 sons in total), including:

Kissoway/ Kaseaway/ Joseph Tanner, the eldest son “the well-known trader of the north-west” reputed to run a brigade of 200 carts.

Cheton/ Jean-Baptiste Tanner (born c. 1852?; died 1937?), married (1875) Victoire Boyer (born 1852 to Louison Boyer and Madeleine Trottier; died 1879/ 1881) and/or Mary?

Basil/ Bazile Tanner (transferred from the Silver Creek Band to Cowessess Band 1891; at Waywayseecappo in 1899.)

The name Peichito (and variations) was used for a number of generations in the family, which makes genealogical reconstruction difficult.

A “letter from Edward Tanner, of Scottsville, a relative of John Tanner, the Indian captive, regarding the captive” apparently was printed in the Kentucky Gazette 4, no. 40, (Friday, 2 October 1818, Volume 31).

Mention of an Ojibwe free trader identified in 1843-1844 as Potshya, a buffalo hunter and trader out of Missouri, affiliated with Peter Garrioch (who was a business partner — and relative — of James Sinclair), has been read as possibly a variation on Petchito (though it seems more likely to be a reference to Joseph Pocha). The link has been suggested because, as a free trader, Peichito is said to have run a sizable cart brigade (at one point consisting of 200 carts) between Red River, Pembina, and St. Paul, Minnestota.

Peichito is possibly the Nai Pecheto a pae who signed the Fort Larmie Treaty on behalf of A’aninin/ ‘White Clay People’/ ‘White Mud’/ Gros Ventres in the U.S. in 1851.

In 1854, Peicheto was identified as Edward Tanner, or Pecheto, a war chief, by his younger half-brother, Esh-ku-goe-ne-be/ Rev. James Tanner, of St. Ann’s/ Poplar Point who died at the Portage in December 1870. In 1854 as well, Pecheto “with three tents” was stationed at Ke’che’na’ah’ynang/ Big Point of Woods on the Pembina River as a guard while a mission was built, after which he went on a buffalo hunt “from June to September … all through the Assiniboine country” as far as the Missouri River.

[?]

Pakoonakesick, married to an unidentified woman.

– 3 sons, 2 daughters.

[No. 49, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Pamanawayashuway/ Pamanawaychuway/ Alexander/ Alexis Tanner (born c. 1840 to Decorby Peicheto/ Pecheto/ Petito/ Samuel or Edward or Decorby Tanner and Nejotekooe) married (c. 1868) to Sarah Hinds/ Hines (born 1857 to Neeconeecappo of the Missouri River and Nancy Bone; entered treaty with the Yellow Quill Band) and Nakaweekupaw/ Caroline Bone (Cree; first entered treaty with Yellow Quill Band; member of Gambler’s Band)

Charles Tanner 2.

[?]

Pamenswiskunzk[?], married to two unidentified women.

– 5 sons.

[No. 54, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Pamwawakahmekummy[?] married to an unidentified woman.

[No. 53, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Paskeenzyoaskmy[?], married to an unidentified woman.

– 5 daughters.

[No. 47, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Penase, married to an unidentified woman.

– 1 son

[No. 51, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Popahmekaket, married to an unidentified woman.

– 2 sons, 3 daughters.

[No. 50, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Poskookat, married to an unidentified woman.

– 3 daughters.

[No. 46, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Potahonekesick[?], married to an unidentified woman.

– 5 sons, 2 daughters, and one other relative.

[No. 52, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

John Rattlesnake [Nadouessioux?/ Midewewe or Ozhiishiigwe?]

Elected Chief, Valley River Band 1897. There is speculation that he was a descendant of the family of Wamegonabiew, a half brother of Shaw-shaw-wa-ne-ba-se/ John ‘Falcon’ Tanner. [NB: another outrider of the Tanner family is “John Tanner Jr. Ottawa Metis, b-1826 arrived 1828 Sault Ste Marie son John Tanner Sr. and Ottawa woman, listed March 28, 1836 treaty.”]

[?] [left Portage by 1865?]

Alexis Robillard (Lower Canadian, born 1812), married Suzanne/ Josephete Tanner Pettito

Jean Baptiste 11.

Suzanne/ Josephete Tanner Pettito’s child was born at Portage and lived there to about age 6 with his mother and grandfather. By 1862, his father had left “to work for the Hudson’s Bay company.” Bishop Grandin enrolled Jean Baptiste in the ‘Indian’ school at Isle a la Crosse to 1870. He rejoined his mother Suzanne/ Josephete “and relations,” in 1871, at Fort Ellice [the Fort Ellice Band — of buffalo hunters — a.k.a. The Gambler’s Band (1881) and/or Wah-wa-shi-cabo/ Waywaysecappo’s Band (1874), along with Kisak-ka-zick, Kannskagunin, and Shapuy-witunk’s Band(s) (1873)].

[?]

Sakakoohet, married to an unidentified woman.

– 2 sons, 1 daughter.

[No. 55, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Sheishycookwa[?] (no wife listed).

– 1 son, 1 daughter.

[No. 56, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Mrs. Spence (widow).

[No. 81, Treaty 1, 2d Payment Paysheet]

[?] [move entry to Poplar Point]

John Edward Tanner (Métis, born 1840 to Rev. James Tanner and Poo-pee/ Margaret Gunn at Lac du Flambeau, Wisconsin Territory, U.S.; died 1932) married (1865) Catherine Dumas (born 1847; died 1866), and (1869) Catherine Marguerite Flora Trottier (born 1840/ 1847 to Joseph Trottier and …; died 1907)

[?]

Tapohaskek (no wife listed)

– 3 sons.

[No. 58, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Tatahquapun[?], married to an unidentified woman.

– 2 daughters.

[No. 57, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Tootosoh (no wife listed).

[No. 59, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Tohgame (no wife listed).

– 1 son.

[No. 60, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Topasquaas, married to an unidentified woman.

– 2 sons.

[No. 61, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Wamessequanawsoh[?], married to an unidentified woman.

– 1 other relative.

[No. 69, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Washkenick, married to an unidentified woman.

– 3 sons, 4 daughters.

[No. 62, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Waskawaskokomope, married to an unidentified woman.

– 5 sons.

[No. 67, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Wasohouk (no wife listed).

[No. 71, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Wawesepenais, married to an unidentified woman.

– 2 sons, 4 daughters.

[No. 65, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Wayhaknaquit, married to an unidentified woman.

– 1 son, 2 daughters.

[No. 63, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Wepinkeekosmaw (no wife listed).

[No. 70, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Wesekim, married to an unidentified woman.

– 1 son, 2 daughters.

[No. 64, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Wesishcoop[?], married to an unidentified woman.

– 1 daughter.

[No. 66, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Wesohkootawyna[?] (widow)

– 1 son, 1 daughter.

[No. 72, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Winnehayo[?], married to an unidentified woman.

[No. 68, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Woasope[?], married to an unidentified woman.

– 1 son, 3 daughters.

[No. 73, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Yellow Quill’s Brother.

[No. 75, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

[?]

Yellow Quill’s Mother.

[No. 74, Treaty 1 Paysheet, 1871]

_______________________________________________________

The Portage

[?]

William G. Bird (Canadian).

Temporary resident, arrested as a member of the ‘Portage Party.’ [See Prisoners, this site.]

[?]

Capt. Charles Arkoll Boulton (Canadian, born 1841).

Temporary resident, arrested as a member of the ‘Portage Party.’ [See Prisoners, this site.]

[?]

W.A. Farmer (Canadian)

Temporary resident, arrested as a member of the ‘Portage Party.’ [See Prisoners, this site.]

[?]

James McBain (Canadian)

Temporary resident, arrested as a member of the ‘Portage Party.’ [See Prisoners, this site.]

[?]

Robert McBain (Canadian)

Temporary resident, arrested as a member of the ‘Portage Party.’ [See Prisoners, this site.]

[?]

Charles McDonald (Canadian)

Temporary resident, arrested as a member of the ‘Portage Party.’ [See Prisoners, this site.]

[?]

Alexander McPherson (Canadian)

Temporary resident, arrested as a member of the ‘Portage Party.’ [See Prisoners, this site.]

[?]

John Switzer/ Swinzer (Canadian)

Temporary resident, arrested as a member of the ‘Portage Party.’ [See Prisoners, this site.]

[?]

H. Williams (Canadian)

Temporary resident, arrested as a member of the ‘Portage Party.’ [See Prisoners, this site.]

[?]

[31] Hilander Bartlett (Non-Aboriginal, born 1820 to Benjamin Bartlett) married an unidentified woman (Non-Aboriginal)

– [32-33] Wilder 24, Orange? P. 18.

Note: Wilder was arrested as a member of the ‘Portage Party.’ [See Prisoners, this site.]

_______________________________________________________

24

[359] Charles William Boddie (Upper Canadian, born 1835 to Charles Boddie)

[#404]

_______________________________________________________

26-52

[499-500] William McKay (Métis, born 1820? to John Richards McKay and an unidentified woman) married Susan Versailles (Métis, born 1825?/ 1832 to #5111 Pierre Versailles and Josephte Letendre)

– [501-506] Joseph 20, Absolon 17, Mary 15, William 12, K. 9, Kavannapass 7.

[#3654]

_______________________________________________________

[28?]

[486] William Cummings (Scottish, born 1834 to James Cummings)

[#992]

[28?]

[487] Robert Wood (Scottish, born 1830)

[#5272]

28

[488] John Mooney (Upper Canadian, born 1841)

[#2762]

Arrested as a member of the ‘Portage Party.’ [See Prisoners, this site.]

[28?]

[489-490] Alexander Aitkin (Orcadian, born 1842 to Thomas Aitkin and an unidentified woman) married Elizabeth Strang (born 1835 to Peter Strang and an unidentified woman)

[#32]

_______________________________________________________

46

[222-223] Hugh McDonald (Scottish, born 1808 to Hugh McDonald and an unidentified woman) married Margaret McPhie (Scottish, born 1820 to Charles McPhie and an unidentified woman)

– [224] Charles 23.

[#3263]

_______________________________________________________

51

[329-330] Malcolm Cummings (Métis, born 1824 to Cuthbert Cummings and an unidentified woman) married Mary Mowat (born 1824; died 1845) and Margaret Gibson (Métis, born 1833 to #1954 Hugh Gibson and Angelique Chalifoux)

– [331-337] Eliza 14, David J. 11, Jane 9, Thomas 8, Bella 7, Catherine 4, Ann Harriet 2.

[#988]

_______________________________________________________

51-53

[338] William Sinclair (Orcadian, born 1844 to William Sinclair and an unidentified woman)

[#4387]

[51-53?]

[339] Lawrence Smith (Scottish Canadian, born 1844)

Arrested as a member of the ‘Portage Party.’ [See Prisoners, this site.]

51-53

[340-341] Francis Ogltree (Irish, born 1825 to M. Ogltree) married Jeannet McLarty (Scottish, born 1822 to Richard McLarty and an unidentified woman)

– [342-346] Annabella 22, Mary Ann 16, Isabella 13, Henry 11, Sarah 8, [347-348] Francis 6, Archibald 3.

[#3743]

51-53

[349-350] John Corner (Upper Canadian, born 1836 to Charles Corner) married Elizabeth Lissons (Upper Canadian, born 1839 to Thomas Lissons)

– [351-352] Francis Alfred 7, Catherine 3.

[#848]

_______________________________________________________

51-58

[308-309] William Favell (Métis, born 1845 to #1515 Richard Favel and Euphinia Anderson) married Annie Gaddy (Métis, born 1846 to William Gaddy and an unidentified woman)

– [310] William Peter 4.

[#1501]

[51-58?]

[311-312] George Davis (Métis, born 1825 to John Davis and an unidentified woman) married Catherine Birston (Metis, born 1835/ 1836 to Magnus Birston and an unidentified woman)

– [313-314] John Thomas 15, Matilda A. 13,  [315-319] F. Edith 11, Ann Elizabeth 9, George 5, Margaret 3, William 2.

[#1045]

51-58

[320-321] James McCorrister (Métis, born 1816/ 1817 to #3292 Alexander McCorrister and Catherine Jones) married Sara Atkinson (Métis, born 1825 to James Atkinson and an unidentified woman)

– [322] Alexander 8.

[#3291]

[51-58?]

[323] Henry Anderson (Métis, born 1823 to James Anderson)

51-58

[324-325] Guillaume Gibaud/ Gibeau (Lower Canadian, born 1830 to John Masse Gibaud) married Margaret Sinclair (Métis, born 1835 to #4378 Bakie Sinclair and Elizabeth Swain)

– [326-328] Caroline 18, Mary 9, Eleanor 4.

[#1803]

_______________________________________________________

53

[360-361] Alexander McDonald (Scottish, born 1840) married Sarah Wawasany (First Nations, born 1850)

[#3329]

– [362] Catherine Desmarais 11 (Métis, daughter of Francois Desmarais).

_______________________________________________________

[58-65?]

[300-301] John Dougall McKay (Métis, born 1827 to William McKay and an unidentified woman) married Harriet McKay (Métis, born 1836 to Richard McKay and an unidentified woman)

– [302-307] Joseph 14, William Charles 12, Julia 8, John James 5, Henry 3, Francois 1.

[#3407]

58-65

[293-292] John Daniel (Métis, born 1843 to William Daniel) married Mary Margaret McIver (Métis, born 1849)

– [294] Elizabeth 1.

[#883]

58-65

[290-291] Allan McIver (Scottish, born 1816 to Donald McIver and an unidentified woman) married Betsy Beads (Métis, born 1826 to John Beads and an unidentified woman)

– [295-299] Catherine 18, Donald 16, Elizabeth 8, John H. 6, Christie B 3.

[#3365]

_______________________________________________________

[61?]

[274-275] Charles Curtis (Usonian, born 1825 to Benjamin Curtis and an unidentified woman) married Cecilia Isbister (Métis, born 1837 to James Isbister and an unidentified woman)

– [276-280] Mary 9, Sara Jane 7, Alice 5, Emma 3, Louisa 1.

[#874]

61

[266-267] Gavin Garrioch (Métis, born 1820 to #1908 William Garrioch and Anne ‘Nancy’ Cook-Sutherland) married Hannah Buck/ Bourke (Métis, born 1830 to John Palmer Buck/ Bourke and an unidentified woman)

– [268-273] William H. 19, John Cepus 14, Edwin G. 15, Ann Harriet 12, Henry Small 6, Andrew James 1.

[#1904]

_______________________________________________________

63

[257-258] Charles Cummings (Métis, born 1810 to Cuthbert Cummings and an unidentified woman) married Sally Garrioch (Métis, born 1818 to #1908 William Garrioch and Anne ‘Nancy’ Cook-Sutherland)

– [256] Charles 24, [259-265] John 22, William 20, Cuthbert 18, James 16, Walter 14, Philip 12, Flora Ann 10.

[#987]

[63?]

[254-255] William Gaddy (Metis, born 1815 to James Gaddy and an unidentified woman) married Margaret Garrioch (Métis, born 1825 to #1908 William Garrioch and Anne ‘Nancy’ Cook-Sutherland)

[#1886]

Buffalo hunting family. William was rumoured to have been arrested and executed during the Resistance — though he was alive afterwards for the Archibald Census. [See Prisoners, this site.]

_______________________________________________________

65

[281-282] Hon. William Garrioch Jr., St. Mary’s la Prairie (Métis, born 1828 to #1908 William Garrioch and Anne ‘Nancy’ Cook-Sutherland) married Mary Brown (Metis, born 1835 to Henry Brown and Elizabeth/ Isabella) [or #543 Magnus Brown and Ann Oliver?])

– [283-289] Jeremina A. 13, Gilbert H. 11, Mary M. 9, Harriet J. 7, Margaret 5, Albert C. 4, Alice E. 2.

[#1907]

_______________________________________________________

66

[246-247] Frederick Adolphus Bird (Métis, born 1823 to George Bird and Ann Thomas) married Ann Garrioch (Métis, born 1826 to #1908 William Garrioch and Anne ‘Nancy’ Cook-Sutherland)

– [248-249] Emma Margaret 19, Clara 14, [250] Catherine 10, [251] Maria 8, Frederick Charles 4, Henry George 2.

[#372]

_______________________________________________________

66-67

[244-245] Thomas Corrigall (Métis, born 1850 to #958 James Corrigall and E. Firth) married Ann Elizabeth Hodgson (Métis, born 1853 to #2198 William Hodgson and Nancy Cook)

[#850]

_______________________________________________________

67

[237-238] William Hodgson (Métis, born 1826/ 1829 to #2201? John Hodgson and Charlotte Inkster) married Nancy Cook (Métis, born 1830 to #945 Samuel Cook and Susannah Short)

– [239-243] Mary Mathilda 15, Joseph 10, Albert 8, Adelaide 4, Edward 1.

[#2198]

_______________________________________________________

67-69

[236] Pierre Mousseau (Métis, born 1849 to Bazile Mousseau)

[#1705]

67-69

[235] Dr. James Spencer Lynch (Upper Canadian, born 1841)

[#2706]

Staked a 600 acre claim on unceded First Nations land on the shore of Lake Manitoba near the mouth of the White-mud River. [See Prisoners, this site]

67-69

[234] Albert Scott (Massachusen, born 1836 to Emery Scott and an unidentified woman)

[#4756]

Possibly a brother of Hon. Alfred H. Scott, Town of Winnipeg?

[67-69?]

[232-233] Alexander Anderson (Scottish, born 1841 to Robert Anderson and an unidentified woman) married Mary McLean (Upper Canadian, born 1851 to John McLean and an unidentified woman)

[#69]

67-69

[230-231] John Hodgson (Métis, born 1792 to John Hodgeson and an unidentified woman) married Charlotte Inkster (Métis, born 1820 to William Inkster)

[#2201?]

_______________________________________________________

69

[225-226] Farquhar McLean (Scottish, born 1836/ 1838 to Donald McLean and an unidentified woman) married Margaret McBain (Upper Canadian, born 1845/ 1846 to Kenneth McBain and an unidentified woman)

– [227-229] Huphenia 5, Isabella 3, Annie 1.

[#3512]

_______________________________________________________

70

[214-215] Kenneth McBain (Scottish, born 1803 to Donald McBain and an unidentified woman) married Elizabeth Urquhart (Scottish, born 1813 to Hugh Urquhart)

– [216-218] Robert John 25, James 22, Elizabeth 21, [219-221] Ronald 18, Catherine 16, Iain/ Jane? 12.

[#3262]

_______________________________________________________

[70-133?]

[1-2] Charles Mair (Upper Canadian, born 1835/ 1838) married Elizabeth Louise McKenney (Upper Canadian, born 1844)

– [3] Louisa Maude 1.

[#2710]

Reputedly, Charles Mair (perhaps with his wife) was arrested in December 1869 then escaped. Presumably, he was a member of the ‘Portage Party.’ [See Prisoners, this site.]

[70-133?]

[4] Louisa Smith (Métis, born 1844 to ‘Little’ Smith)

70-133

[6-7] John McLean (Scottish Ontarian, born 1818) married Rhoda (born 1821; died 1870)

– [8-14] Christine 22, Alexander 23, Margaret 18, Daniel 16, Grace 12, Rhoda 10, John 9.

[#3450]

John and Alexander McLean were arrested as a members of the ‘Portage Party.’ [See Prisoners, this site.]

[70-133?] [Big Ridges]

[15] C. Caulard/ Cowlard (Englander, born 1834)

_______________________________________________________

92

[205-206] Peter Anderson (born 1825/ 1827 to #78 James Anderson) married Letitia McKay (Métis, born 1837 to #3412 John B. McKay)

– [207-213] William James 18, Eliza 14, Harriet 12, Peter 9, John B. 6, Mary Ann 5, Lydia 3.

[#90]

_______________________________________________________

92-111

[185-186] Thomas Anderson Jr. (Métis, born 1833 to #94 Thomas Anderson Sr. and Catherine Landry) married Fanny Pocha (Métis, born 1840 to #3943 Joseph Pocha and Josephte Descoleaux) and Elizabeth Desmarais (Metis, born 1838; died 1858)

– [187-192] Henry Anderson 13, Caleb 11, Charles 9, Joshua 7, Betsy 5, Mary Ann 2

[#92]

[92-111?]

[193-194] John Anderson (Métis, born 1850 to #94 Thomas Anderson Sr. and Catherine Landry) married Anne Halcrow (Métis, born 1852 to #2088 David Halcrow and Elizabeth Corrigal)

[#83]

92-111

[195-196] Thomas Anderson (Métis, born 1804/ 1806 to #79 James Anderson and Mary Demoran) married Catherine Landry (Métis, born 1804/ 1809 to Louis Landry and an unidentified woman)

[#94]

92-111

[197-198] Bazile Mousseau/ Moosoo (Metis, born 1840 to Bazile Mousseau/ Moosoo and an unidentified woman) married Catherine Anderson (Métis, born 1833 to #94 Thomas Anderson and Catherine Landry)

– [199-203] Catherine  8, Mary Sarah 6, William 4, Nancy 3, Eliza 1.

[#2763]

92-111

[204] James Park (Métis, born 1840 to James Park)

[#3849]

_______________________________________________________

107

[367-368] Rev’d. Henry George (Englander, born 1832 to Henry George) married Mary Ann Cochrane (Non-Aboriginal, born 1832 to Archibald Cochrane and an unidentified woman)

– [369-374] Ann 14, William Henry 12, Edward James 10, Maria J. 7, Mary Elmira 5, C. Jane 2.

[#1936]

_______________________________________________________

107-114

[375] John Forrister (Englander, born 1820 to Robert Forrister)

[#1446]

107-114

[376-377] Adam Haddleston (Englander, born 1833 to Adam Haddleston and an unidentified woman) married Proscina Bornes (Englander, born 1839 to James Bornes and an unidentified woman)

– [378] Annie 12, [379] Adam 10, James 8, Edward 5, Charles 3, Henry 1.

[#2147]

[107-114?]

[363-364] John Spence (Métis, born 1825 to Magnus Spence and an unidentified woman) married Charlotte Whiford (First Nations, born 1820)

– [365-366] Abraham 19, Absalon 11.

[#3680]

[107-114?]

[358] Daniel Sissons (Upper Canadian, born 1847 to Thomas Sissons)

Arrested as a member of the ‘Portage Party.’ [See Prisoners, this site.]

_______________________________________________________

109

[438-439] John Garrioch (First Nations/ Métis, born 1823/ 1833 to #1908 William Garrioch and Anne ‘Nancy’ Cook-Sutherland) married Elizabeth ‘Eliza’ Campbell (First Nations/ Métis, born 1824/ 1834 to Colin Campbell and Elizabeth McGillivray)

– [440-441] George 25, Mary Harriet 20, [442] Flora 15, [443-447] Ellen 13, Jessie 11, Walter Scott 9, Maria 6, William O.M. 1.

[#1905 or #1827?]

John Garrioch reportedly took treaty with, or at the same time as the St. Peter’s Band (Treaty 1, 1871); named as No. 127 in the 1875 St. Peter’s Band Annuity Paylist, with wife. In the scip affidavit of his daughter, Flora, John is described as Métis, not First Nations.

According to John’s son, Alfred Campbell Garrioch, First furrows : a history of the early settlement of the Red River country, including that of Portage la Prairie (Winnipeg: Stovel 1923) 228-229, the elder son, George Garrioch, went with the Portage Party to Kildonan Parish, witnessed the escape attempt of Norbert Parisien, but refused to shoot him. A.C. Garrioch was at St. John’s College at the time.

[109?]

[436-437] Roderick McLeod (Scottish, born 1834/ 1838 to John McLeod and an unidentified woman) married Margaret Flett (Non-Aboriginal, born 1840 to John Flett and an unidentified woman)

[#3545]

[109?]

[425-426] Joseph Little (Englander/ Ontarian, born 1832 to Joseph Little and an unidentified woman) married Elizabeth Forrester (Non-Aboriginal, born 1836 to Robert Forrester and an unidentified woman)

– [427-435] Jane Ann 14, George 13, Martha 12, Mary 11, Robert 10, Elizabeth 8, Margaret 6, Catherine 4, Joseph 2.

[#2697]

_______________________________________________________

113

[448-449] John James Setter (Métis, born 1833/ 1837 to George Setter and an unidentified woman) married Ann Matheson (Non-Aboriginal, born 1838 to Hugh Matheson and an unidentified woman)

– [450-451] Maurice G. 5, Christina I. 3.

[#4361]

_______________________________________________________

113-119

[452] James Johnston (born 1832) married Mary Anderson (Métis, born 1834 to James Anderson and an unidentified woman)

[#2436]

[453-454] James Johnston (Métis, born 1830/ 1832/ 1847? to James Johnston and an unidentified woman) married Julia Gibbon/ Gibson/ Gibeau (First Nations, born 1851 to William Gibbon/ Gibson/ Gibeau) and Isabella Spence (deceased?)

– [455] William James 2.

[#2422?]

113-119?

[456-457] Caleb Anderson (Métis, born 1830/ 1833 to #78 James Anderson and Jane Truthwaite) married Isabella Dennett (Métis, born 1838/ 1840 to #1223 Andrew Dennett and Ellen Moore)

[#72]

– [458] James Sinclair 12 (Métis, son of James Sinclair).

113-119

[459-460] Richard Favel (First Nations/ Métis, born 1811/ 1812 to #1520 Thomas Favel and Sally Trout) married Euphenia Anderson (Métis, born 1834 to James Anderson and an unidentified woman)

– [462-463] David 18, Harriet 11, Victoria 9.

[#1515]

A Richard Favel reportedly took treaty at the same time as, or with the St. Peter’s Band (Treaty 1, 1871).

113-119

[464-465] Richard Favel (Métis, born 1842/ 1846 to #1515 Richard Favel and Euphenia Anderson) married Margurite Sayer (Métis, born 1848 to George Sayer and an unidentified woman)

– [466-467] George Richard 3, Sarah 1.

[#1516]

113-119

[468-469] Samuel Giddens/ Giddings (Métis, born 1845) married Sarah Favel (Métis, born 1855 to Richard Favel and an unidentified woman)

[#1820]

_______________________________________________________

114

[384-385] David Casitar (Orcadian, born 1827 to John Casitar and an unidentified woman) married Margaret Whitford (Métis, born 1840 to James Whitford and an unknown woman)

– [386-393] John 13, James 9, Jemima 7, William 6, Jane 4, Margaret 3, Mary E. 1.

[#767]

114-116

[394] George A. Hill (Torontonian, born 1847 to Rev’d James Hill and an unidentified woman)

[#2181]

114-116?

[395-396] John Corrigal (Métis, born 1839 to #961 James Corrigal and Anna Anderson) married Alice Matheson (Non-Aboriginal, born to #3091 Hugh Matheson and Margaret Ross)

– [397] Robert Charles 2.

[#959?]

_______________________________________________________

116

[398-399] James Corrigal (Orcadian, born 1794/ 1795 to John Corrigal and an unidentified woman) married Catherine Flett (Métis, born 1825 to William Flett and an unidentified woman)

– [400-405] Fanny 22, Joseph 19, Henry 17, Roderick 15, Flora 13, Anna Bella 11.

[#854]

_______________________________________________________

119

[470-471] Alexander Whitford (Métis, born 1843/ 1845 to #5180 Peter Whitford and Christy Spence) married Elizabeth Jane Cook (Métis, born 1851 to Charles Cook and an unidentified woman)

– [472] Archibald 2.

[#5179]

119?

[473-474] John Anderson (Métis, born 1827/ 1832 to #88 John Anderson and Mary Desmarais) married Christiana Whitford (Métis, born 1833/ 1834 to #5180 Peter Whitford and Christy Spence)

– [475-481] Albert Anderson 14, Elizabeth 12, Edward 10, Peter 7, Harriet 5, Alexander 3, Emma 1.

[#84]

_______________________________________________________

120

[406-407] Peter Henderson (Métis, born 1826 to #2164 Peter Henderson and Charlotte Yorkston) married Eleonor Whitford (Métis, born 1829 to Peter Whitford and an unidentied woman)

– [408-410] Maria 23, Charles 21, James 19, [411-415] Margaret 15, Eliza 13, William 11, Mary M. 9, [?] George 5.

[#2165]

_______________________________________________________

121

[416-417] Peter Henderson (Métis, born 1845 to #2164 Peter Henderson and Charlotte Yorkston) married Ann Marie Halcrow (Métis, born 1839 to David Halcrow and an unidentified woman)

– [418-420] Ellen 3, Eliza 2, Margaret 2.

[#2180]

_______________________________________________________

122

[421-422] Robert Flett (Non-Aboriginal, born 1844 to #1596 John Flett  and Isabel Murray) married Ann Bannerman (Non-Aboriginal, born 1845 to #182 Alexander Bannerman and Jannet McKay)

– [423] John 1.

[#1599]

[122?]

[424] Gabriel Flett (Non-Aboriginal, born 1830 to John Flett)

_______________________________________________________

132

[482-483] William McDonald (Métis, born 1839 to #3334 Neil McDonald and Ann Logan) married Chrsitian McKay (Métis, born 1847 to William McKay and an unidentified woman)

– [484-485] Robert Kenneth 3, Annie 1.

[#3266]

_______________________________________________________

133

[5] Alexander Murray (Irish Canadian, born 1828)

[#3692]

Arrested as a member of the ‘Portage Party.’ [See Prisoners, this site.]

_______________________________________________________

The Očhéthi Šakówiŋ/ ‘Sioux’ Village(s)

From 1821, ‘The Sioux’/ Dakota had made occasional visits to Upper Fort Garry, professing friendship. The U.S.- Santee Sioux wars began in 1862. On 28 December of that year “The first Sioux refugees, a group of eighty-six, appeared at Fort Garry,” fifteen of whom were from the ‘lower bands’ — Mdewakanton or Wahpekutes. They stayed only two days, concluded a treaty with the Métis, then returned to their winter camp at Devil’s Lake, U.S.

In May 1863, Taoyateduta/ Little Crow returned to Fort Garry with “a party of about eighty Sioux, including a few women.” Little Crow “said that the elders of the tribe had been told during the War of 1812 that if they ever got into trouble with the Americans they should appeal to the British, and the ‘folds of the red flag in the north would wrap them round and preserve them from their enemies.” He requested sanctuary for his people in British territory, then departed.

On 20 November 1863 “a small party arrived, followed by a much larger group on December 11. More continued to arrive until about six hundred Sioux were camped at Sturgeon Creek, some six miles from the fort.” They eventually moved about twenty miles further west on the White Horse Plain, then broke into smaller hunting and fishing camps. Chief Eatoka/ Shakpedan/ Zhaagobens/ Little Shakopee/ Sakpe/ ‘Little Six‘ (a leader of the Yankton Dakota in Minnesota), and Wa-Kan-O-Zhan-Zhan/ Wa-Kan-O-Zan-Zan/ ‘Medicine Bottle‘ were deceived, drugged, and subjected to a cross-border abduction by Canadian residents of the Town of Winnipeg. (They were transported to prison in Fort Snelling, tried before a military tribunal, and executed there on 11 November 1865.)

The remaining Sioux hunted buffalo alongside Métis the following spring. On their return, the number of Sioux had increased to almost 3000. They were led by Tatanka-najin/ Standing Buffalo, Waanatan [II], Wapasha [III] / Wapahasha/ Wabasha/ ‘The Leaf’/ ‘Red Leaf’/ ‘Red Flag’, and Wakinyanwaste/ Waka-nyaw-waste/ Wakingaste/ Wakinyanwaste/ Wa-kin-yan-was-te / ‘Turning Thunder’/ Andrew Good Thunder. They made their primary camps in the vicinity of Portage la Prairie, High Bluff and Poplar Point.

Reportedly, the Sioux were regarded as interlopers by some Saulteaux. Allegedly, in 1864 a Sioux fishing camp on Lake Manitoba was fired upon by Saulteaux — leaving 20 people dead. Other attacks were reported sporadically. Nevertheless many of the Sioux returned to the Portage area on seasonal rounds and by 1865 there were about 680 lodges west of Upper Fort Garry.

In December 1869 five hundred Sioux were said to be wintering at Portage la Prairie, including a group recently arrived from the Mouse/ Souris River, near the international boundary. More arrived in 1870. Although subsequently many moved away from the area — either back to the U.S., or to reserves — some stayed, creating Portage la Prairie Sioux Village No. 8a along the Assiniboine south of Portage.

_______________________________________________________

[?]

[hereditary Chief] Ta-Tanka-Nazin/ Tatanka-najin/ ‘Standing Buffalo’ (Santee Sisseton, born 1820 to Star Face and an unidentified woman; died 1869/ 1870, Montana)

Mobile inhabitant. In 1862-1864, crossed the boundary into British territory, leading about 500 refugees. Left, then recrossed 1866. Band devastated by smallpox 1869-1870.

[?]

[hereditary Chief] Matokinajin/ ‘Standing Bear’/ ‘Little Standing Buffalo’/ Louis Philippe Abelard (Santee born c. 1850 to Standing Buffalo and an unidentified woman).

Mobile inhabitant. Obtained a reserve 1878 (Saskatchewan).

[?]

[Chief] Wapahaska/ ‘Whitecap’/ ‘White Warbonnet’ (Santee, born 1819; died 1889)

Mobile. In 1862-1864, crossed the boundary into British territory with Little Crow and refugees; carried an alliance medal from the War of 1812, which he showed to British officials as a reminder of his nation’s relationship with the Crown. Hunted with Métis — particularly the brigade led by Jean Baptiste Wilkie, and with that of Pierre Berger and George Racette. Obtained a reserve 1879 (Saskatchewan).

[?]

Tumma

“spoke some French”

[?]

‘Northwind’/ Thomas ‘Tom‘ Whiteman (born to ‘Old Dacotah’ and an unidntified woman)

Married twice. Settled at Standing Buffalo Reserve, near Fort Qu’Appelle [SK]

[?]

Women, children, and men of Taoyateduta/ Little Crow’s Band

[?]

Women, children, and men of  Eatoka/ Shakpedan/ Zhaagobens/ Little Shakopee/ Sakpe/ Little Six’s Band

_______________________________________________________

Saulteaux Families listed as present in 1851

by A.C. Garrioch, The Correction Line (Winnipeg: Stovel, 1933), 194-195.

_______________________________________________________

Ain-di-bah-ting/ ‘Sitting Firmly By It’

At-a-ka-wi-nin/ ‘Gambler’

Ka-pa-yu-tungh/ ‘Standing by It Always’

Kee-koo-sas/ ‘Little Fish’

Kee-na-swa/ ‘Cut to a Point’

Kih-chee-wis/ ‘A Large Tent’

Kih-chip-i-nas/ ‘The Great Bird’

Kwing-qwa-ha-ka/ ‘Wolverine’

Ma-chih-ki-wis/ ‘The Evil One’

Ma-na-pit/ ‘Ugly Tooth’

Mis-si-si-ka-koos/ ‘Big Little Skunk’

Moo-soos/ ‘Moose Calf’

Mus-ka-goo/ ‘A Swampy [Cree]’

Nee-can-ji-wun/ ‘Before the Current’

Oo-ki-ma-wi-nin/ ‘The Man in Power’

Oo-sa-oo-cheet/ ‘Yellow behind’

Oo-sa-oo-kwon/ ‘Yellow quill’

Pa-kwah-ki-kun

Pah-ki-ta-oon/ ‘Stricken’

Pa-swain/ ‘Oily’

Pa-ta-ka-koo-si

Pi-na-sio-pee/ ‘Thunder Water’

William Peechee/ ‘Something moving’

Wee-skoop

Wi-si-kun/ ‘Sour’

_______________________________________________________

Advertisements

Responses

  1. this is awesome thankyou….


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: