During 1870 (April)

1870

In the U.S.:

1 April: Intelligence man at St. Paul MN, H.P. Dwight, sends a telegram to John A. Macdonald, saying that John C. Schultz and George Duncan McVicar have arrived from Duluth MN.

[LAC, John A. Macdonald Correspondence April 01, 1870, MIKAN no. 516206.]

Macdonald’s secret agent at St. Paul MN, John Rankin, writes that he has information, from 3 people from Red River [John C. Schultz, George Duncan McVicar, and James Monkman], that there is a plan to assert Canadian authority at the Settlement and “vindicate the dignity of the Crown.”

[LAC, John A. Macdonald Correspondence April, 1870, MIKAN no. 495868.]

In Assiniboia:

1 April: there is a “great deal” of water on the river ice, and the snow is “rapidly” melting.

Canadian rumours circulate, alleging: James J. Hill of St. Paul arrived on business; Joseph Rolette Sr. came in from Pembina; J.E. Norbert Gay of Upper Fort Garry came into the Town of Winnipeg; [Hon.] Hugh Francis Olone and business partner Cosgrove were in a fight with Vermette; there is cleaning going on at Upper Fort Garry; the bridge on the Assiniboine River is floating; a number of Sioux threatened [Charles] House [a Canadian at Portage la Prairie]; the Sioux are angry at being turned back from Red River; Bishop Alexandre-Antonin Taché is at White Horse Plains; there will be trouble from ‘Indians.’

[Begg, Red River Journal349.]

In Canada:

1 April: The Toronto Globe reports:

1 April

In Assiniboia:

2 April: the New Nation (2 April 1870), is published and includes pages from the New Nation (18 Mar. 1870) issue. The latter pages include reports on: “Peace”; ”Imperial Responsibility,” which is a letter written by Alexander Kennedy Isbister; and anti-Confederation sentiment in Newfoundland. The pages dated 2 Apr. report on: a new proprietor for the newspaper: “Tranquility”; the debates of the Legislative Assembly of Assiniboia Session 1, Day 2 (15 March), including Bishop Alexandre-Antonin Taché’s address; a message from President Louis Riel; news of the delegates to Otawa; terms for an agreement between the Provisional Government and the HBC; a refutation of opinions published in the Canadian Press; a description of the St. Patrick’s Day celebration at Red River.

Canadian rumours circulate, alleging: the New Nation letter, from President Louis Riel to HBC Gov. William Mactavish, outlining terms to be agreed to, has already been agreed to by Mactavish; 51 cattle with consumption [tuberculosis] at HBC Lane’s Fort have been killed; the Sioux had been given 1 of the infected cattle; ‘Indians’ stole John McDougall’s trade outfit on the Saskatchewan and killed 3 miners; business is reviving; Pether, a Canadian Commissioner is arranging for passage through ‘Indian territory’ for a Red River Expeditionary Force.

In Canada:

2 April: The Toronto Globe reports:

2 April

2 Apr. b

2 Apr. c

In Assiniboia:

3 April: Canadian rumours circulate, alleging: Miles and Joseph McDermott (brothers-in-law to HBC Gov. William Mactavish), came in from Pembina with HBC horses; the HBC Pembina post is short on cattle fodder, so put the livestock out to neighbors; 4 policemen are stationed in the Town of Winnipeg; on the order of President Louis Riel, £60 of goods were sent as presents to the Sioux at Portage la Prairie from White Horse Plain.

In the U.S.:

3 April: Hon. Alfred H. Scott meets with Joseph A. Wheelock, an ardent American expansionist, and editor of the  Daily Press, in St. Paul Minnesota (and possibly meets with Oscar Malmros who had recently resigned his position as American Consul at Winnipeg), and communicates the contents of the Red River List of Rights. Wheelock subsequently writes of the meeting to United States SenatorAlexander Ramsey of Minnesota, avowing that the annexationist movement is strong, that a promise of armed American support ought to be made to Louis Riel, and that Wheelock has made arrangements for Alfred H. Scott to meet with railway magnate and financier Jay Cooke, along with George Sheppard (at the time a reporter for the New York Tribune, but formerly with Toronto’s Globe), in New York – the meetings presumably to take place after Scott’s mission to Ottawa.

In Assiniboia:

4 April: The Legislative Assembly of Assiniboia Law Committee meets.

Canadian rumours circulate, alleging: the Constitution Committee, Hay Privilege Committee, and Law Committees are in session; “Shamon”/ Shawman/ Pa-pa-nay/ George Racette [Jr.], a ‘great friend of John C. Schultz,’ is at Portage la Prairie with Sioux Chief Standing Buffalo and warriors; Standing Buffalo is friendly; Shamon is likely to be arrested; the HBC is likely to resume business tomorrow.

[Begg, Red River Journal350.]

In Canada:

4 April: The Toronto Globe reports:

4 April

In Assiniboia:

5 April: The Legislative Assembly of Assiniboia Law Committee meets.

There is “unmitigated mud” and duck hunting in the Town of Winnipeg.

Canadian rumours circulate, alleging: the HBC was not given its keys by [President] Louis Riel; the Northern Packet has gone outward from the Settlement with a letter to missionaries; plains hunters heading in to the Settlement and are likely to arrive mid-May; the Legislative Assembly committees are meeting; [Chief Justice]  James Ross, while drunk, said he was a tool of Riel; [Hon.] William Auld Tait called James Ross a rogue; Charles House of Portage la Prairie came in to Winnipeg complaining of ‘Indians’; a guard is to be sent to Portage la Prairie; Riel is at White Horse Plains.

In Canada:

The Toronto Globe reports:

5 April

In Assiniboia:

6 April: The Legislative Assembly of Assiniboia Law Committee meets.

Canadian rumours circulate, alleging: a Committee of the legislative assembly is meeting, but they are slow; the HBC is without keys to its storehouses; the Provisional Government is separating John C. Schultz‘s goods from HBC property; ‘the French’ of the Provisional Government stole HBC goods – especially [Hon.] Ambroise-Dydime Lépine; ‘the Scotch’ who wintered out on the plains with their cattle have returned; business is reviving; the settlers’ confidence is notable, but ‘Indians’ will be a problem; ‘Americans’ say they are leaving;

[Begg, Red River Journal, 351.]

In Canada:

6 April: A large public meeting is held at Toronto and adopts a resolution denouncing the reception of the Red River delegates to Ottawa, who are regarded as complicit in the ‘murder’ of Thomas Scott.

Scott’s brother, Hugh Scott, has a letter received from Rev. George Young [Canadian Methodist missionary at Red River] informing him about the ‘murder.’ Hugh Scott writes to John A. Macdonald asking for vengeance and vowing blood.

[LAC, John A. Macdonald Correspondence April 06, 1870, MKAN no. 498574.]

Alexander McMicken at Windsor ON, writes to his father Gilbert McMicken [leader of the “Western Frontier Constabulary” who work as undercover agents for John A. Macdonald] that John C. SchultzGeorge Duncan McVicar, and James Monkman are on the way to Ottawa. “Chamblin” [Shamon/ Shawman/  George Racette Jr.] is at [Herr’s?] house, and is “very intimate” with Bulten [Button? Boulton?], and “talks a little” with Schultz. He has been to Pembina and is up to something that Schultz should be asked about, but in the meantime, “We will keep a good lookout on his movements.”

[LAC, John A. Macdonald Correspondence April 06, 1870, MIKAN no,  523362.]

In the U.S.:

7 April: William Marshall, former Governor of Minnesota, is slated to leave St. Paul, Minnesota, on a mission to Fort Garry. Marshall had arrived in St. Paul from Washington, where he had been lobbying on behalf of Jay Cooke in March of 1870. Cooke had directed Marshall to make the journey to Red River, on the basis of intelligence received from “our friends in Winnipeg.” Marshall seems to have delayed leaving St. Paul for one week, “to await the President’s instructions” (President Ulysses S. Grant being a close friend of both Jay Cooke and his brother, Henry Cooke).

In Assiniboia:

7 April: The Legislative Assembly of Assiniboia Law Committee meets.

The Red River is rising, the ice is impassable.

Canadian rumours circulate, alleging: the Constitution Committee of the legislative Assembly is meeting; England’s flag went up at Upper Fort Garry, replacing the Provisional Government flag; Patrice Breland is off to the interior tomorrow to tell the winterers that there is peace and the trade business is open; Breland’s message is to counteract Indian unrest; Charles Flett’s sudden death took place while he was drinking with [Hon.] Thomas Bunn at Lennon & Cosgrove’s saloon; [Hon.] Dr. Curtis James Bird will hold an inquest; ‘Americans’ are “scared” and will leave Red River; there was no U.S. mail, but 5 bags are on the way.

[Begg, Red River Journal, 352.]

8 April: The Legislative Assembly of Assiniboia Law Committee meets.

The river is rising, the ice is breaking up. A Guard is stationed at Whitehorse Plains. Men are fixing the bridge over the Assiniboine in front of Upper Fort Garry, preparing for the open water season.

The New Nation (8 April 1870), reports on: “Maj H.M. Robinson,” as the new U.S. Vice-Consul at Winnipeg; Bishop Alexandre-Antonin Taché at White Horse Plains; the HBC and the Provisional Government having agreed on terms: business being normal; articles in the Toronto Globe, Hamilton Times, and Spectator; the Interior Mails going out with instructions regarding governance of the North-West; “North Pacific Railway and Red River”; the Death Notice for Thomas Sinclair Sr.; an inquest set into death of Charles Flett of Kildonan; the Death Notice for Norbert Parisien; “St. Boniface Band,” concert; the weather, returning birds, mud, ducks hunted, the Sioux; the Assiniboine bridge.

Canadian rumours circulate, alleging: the HBC has its keys; the legislative assembly’s committee is meeting; no U.S. mail has come in; the roads are bad; there is no flag flying at Upper Fort Garry; a man fell in the river; Capt. J.E. Norbert Gay is at Upper Fort Garry; ‘the Sioux’ shot 20 Plains hunters (this is not widely believed); Patrice Breland has left for the interior.

In Canada:

8 April: Two of the Legislative Assembly of Assiniboia Delegates — Hon. Alfred H. Scott and Rev. N.-J. Ritchot — arrive at Ottawa.

In the U.S.:

8 April: Intelligence man H.P. Dwight at St. Paul MN telegraphs John A. Macdonald a fairly lengthy account: Canadians D.A. Campbell, W. Hall, J.W. Coombs, Mrs. Rev. Young, and her son George Young Jr. arrived from Red River, having left there on 13 March 1870, “deeming it unsafe to remain there longer”;  Rev. George Young [a Canadian Methodist missionary], who is still at Red River, reports that “Riel’s half breeds” suspect [President]  Louis Riel of self-interest and that he has £30,000 worth of HBC furs that he intends to sell to enrich himself and/or pay for an escape if necessary; the St. Paul Pioneer is advocating annexation to the U.S., is highly critical of “despotic” Riel and his “gang of halfbreed ruffians” (who ought to be “wiped out”), and predicts troops will soon be sent to “restore order and law”; the St. Paul Press found the execution of Thomas Scott to be justified, as he had avowed an intention to take Riel’s life and had “twice made war” on the “peaceful community,” and the newspaper predicts that Canada will use the execution as a pretext to send a force of 2000 men to Red River to put down the “half breeds.”

[LAC, John A. Macdonald Correspondence April 08, 1870, MIKAN no. 560848.]

In Assiniboia:

9 April: The Legislative Assembly of Assiniboia Law Committee meets.

It is raining and the river is open.

Canadian rumours circulate, alleging: the HBC was granted a 1st bill of exchange on the London market; the HBC is taking inventory; legislative assembly Committees held mettings then adjourned for a week; a U.S. mailman crossed over the ice; the U.S. mail went out, but river crossing will be a problem; the river has stopped the U.S. mail; a French and English Proclamation was issued, granting pardons and amnesty, stating the highways are open, that HBC business is to resume, that peace is to reign, that Canada is amicable, rights are to be guaranteed under confederation as an equal province, the united national will at Red River is to be respected, but beware of calamitous foreigner-created divisions – they compromise public safety, which is a prosecutable offence.

[Begg, Red River Journal, 353, 354, 355.]

In Canada:

9 April: Governor-General Sir John Young, Baron of Lisgar, contacts John A. Macdonald regarding “the homicide” of Thomas Scott, the delegates from Red River, the transfer date for the territory, money, and troops.

[LAC, John A. Macdonald Correspondence April 09, 1870, Mikan no. 508993.]

In Assiniboia:

10 April: the river is up and the ice is moving. Freshets in the settlement are damaging bridges, but there is no flood.

11 April: Canadian rumours circulate, alleging: the Sioux are causing trouble at Portage la Prairie (though this is not widely believed); Burr at Portage left for British Columbia leaving debts behind, for which he has been arrested; [President] Riel is unpacking McDougall’s furniture in Governmant House; Louis Schmidt gave an address in French to the people, promising peace; J.E. Gay, carrying the Proclamation and Schmidt’s Address into Winnipeg, fell in a puddle when his horse baulked; Gov. Mactavish’s health is improving; the HBC is still taking inventory, so the store is not open; the U.S. mail bag arrived empty.

[Begg, Red River Journal, 355.]

In the U.S.:

11 April: Norman Wolfred Kittson sends  Donald A. Smith a telegram, informing him that Judge John Black and  Charles Arkoll Boulton arrived at St. Paul and will leave for Ottawa on Monday.

[LAC, John A. Macdonald Correspondence April 11, 1870. MIKAN no. 503430.]

In Canada:

11 April: The delegates of the Assembly of Assiniboia arrive at Ottawa.

American ‘special’ and ‘secret’ agent, James Wickes Taylor, writes from Ottawa to Hamilton Fish, Secretary of State in Washington:

“A dispatch from Ottawa April 9 announces that the Government of Canada has determined to receive Rev. Mr. Richot [sic] and Mr. Alfred H. Scott as delegates from Red River, and will make propositions based on the Bill of Rights lately adopted by the Convention of the Winnipeg people.”

12 April: Alfred H. Scott is arrested and jailed, on a warrant issued in Toronto, for aiding and abetting the “murder of Thomas Scott.”

[John C. Schultz has word of his appointment as a Senator of the soon-to-be new province?]

In the U.S.:

12 April: William Marshall leaves St. Paul MN and heads to Upper Fort Garry.

In Assiniboia:

12 April: the river is fully open and rising.

Canadian rumours circulate, alleging: the Provisional Government flag is flying at Red River; the mail includes published Canadian Government correspondence regarding Red River, some of the statements are causing indignation at the Settlement; the U.S. mail went out; HBC inventory-taking continues; HBC Gov. Mactavish’s health is improved, he has been seen on walks.

13 April: “much ice” is passing on the Assiniboine River; the river rise is rapid.

Canadian rumours circulate, alleging: Modest Romain is a prisoner; HBC Lane’s Fort is in Company hands; the Settlement is quiet; the dam broke at John Inkster‘s mill, but is now repaired.

[Begg, Red River Journal, 357.]

In Canada:

13 April: In Ottawa, N.J. Ritchot is placed under arrest, for aiding and abetting the “murder of Thomas Scott.”

In Assiniboia:

14 April: it is “bitter cold” and the river is rising.

Canadian rumours circulate, alleging: F.H. Burr is at Upper Fort Garry, charged with defrauding Andrew G.B. Bannatyne and other merchants; the roads are bad and no U.S. mail arrived; Emmerling’s Hotel has closed and a boarder was put out; there is division among the Sioux at Portage la Prairie, resulting in 2 deaths, and they are proposing to move; [President] Louis Riel and 6 guards rode to White Horse Plain to see about the Sioux.

[357; http://www.biographi.ca/009004-119.01-e.php?BioId=40117 notes, that in July 1870,  John Bruce “wrote to Bishop Alexandre-Antonin Taché of the problems faced by Riel in coping with Indians who came for help in response to promises made to them during the winter by anti-Riel agitator John Christian Schultz and by agents of McDougall.”]

15 April: Good Friday is stormy with drifting snow. The stores in the Town of Winnipeg are closed for the holiday.

The New Nation (15 April 1870), reports: the text, in French and English, of the “Proclamation to the People of the North-West”; a “Government Notice”; the text of Bill #3 An Act Providing for a Military Force; the text of Bill #4  An Act Respecting Indemnity to Members; the text of Bill #1 An Act Respecting the Hay Privilege; the text of Bill #2 An Act Providing for the Due Administration of Public Justice; the text of Bill #5 An Act Respecting the Hay Privilege; the Second Session of the Legislative Assembly of Assiniboia is announced; James McKay‘s appointment as Indian Commissioner is announced; French & English “News from Ottawa”; plans for the Queen’s Birthday; Adelaide Schmidt Moreau has died; the snow has left Hon. Hugh Francis Olone storm-staid south of the Settlement.

Canadian rumours circulate, alleging: no U.S. mail arrived; the HBC is still taking inventory; HBC Gov. William Mactavish is improving; Burr has denied the charges against him and will show his books.

[Begg, Red River Journal, 357.]

16 April: snow is melting.

Canadian rumours circulate, alleging: it is “strange” that men who ‘kept in the shade’ during the troubles, are now claiming monetary rewards due from the Canadian Government; the U.S. mail went out; the rejected William McDougall’s furniture, brought to Red River for his elusive Government House are “magnificent”; letters were found with William McDougall’s furniture, the contents of which were “racy”, and they will be published in the New Nation.

17 April: Easter Sunday is warm and pleasant.

Canadian rumours circulate, alleging: [Hon.] Alfred H. Scott stole HBC furs and took them to Ottawa; [Hon.] A.H. Scott gave [Hon.] Hugh Francis Olone orders for advances on [Hon.] William Bernard O’Donoghue [Treasurer of the Provisional Government], which were refused – [Hon.] A.H. Scott is in the Provisional Government for the money; the Settlement is quiet; HBC Gov. William Mactavish‘s health is improving.

18 April: the weather is warm, the level of the river is stable.

Canadian rumours circulate, alleging: the Provisional Government has paid off its soldiers, most of whom refused to re-enlist; the men in Upper Fort Garry and the Town of Winnipeg are drunk; money is more plentiful in the Settlement; Burr is a Upper Fort Garry with his books and neighbours, who say he is innocent; there is no U.S. mail; William McDougall’s letters are to be published; [President] Louis Riel is uppity and unpopular and not suited to rule here; Thomas Spence is sending 2 men to Lake of the Woods to scout John C. Schultz’s prize parcel of land.

[Begg, Red River Journal, 359.]

In Canada:

18 April: Alexander McMicken at Windsor ON, writes to his father Gilbert McMicken [leader of the “Western Frontier Constabulary” who work as undercover agents for John A. Macdonald], that there are rumours of a Fenian attack being planned against the Red River Expeditionary Force.

[LAC, John A. Macdonald Correspondence April 18, 1870, MIKAN no. 523370.]

In Assiniboia:

19 April: The Legislative Assembly of Assiniboia Law Committee meets.

The river has risen.

Canadian rumours circulate, alleging: “many” plan to leave the Settlement; Canadians are plotting something, previously 2 were residing in John C. Schultz’s house,  now there are 12 — Agnes Campbell Farquharson Schultz is behind it; along with 4 others, they are likely to be “put across the line”; [Hon.] Hugh Francis Olone “received account” from Schultz, so the latter must be nearby; ‘the French’ drunk; there is no U.S. mail in, due to the bad roads; U.S. mail went out.

[Begg, Red River Journal, 360.]

20 April: The Legislative Assembly of Assiniboia Law Committee meets.

The weather is warm, the river level is up.

Canadian rumours circulate, alleging: [President] Louis Riel ordered the Union Jack be raised; [Hon.] William Bernard O’Donoghue took it down; Riel said that O’Donoghue is a U.S. annexationist, and the Provisional Government flag is only to be flown under the protection of the British flag, which has gone up again; O’Donoghue wanted to leave, but did not, because of his oath.

In Canada:

20 April: Alexander Morris (minister of inland revenue), writes to John A. Macdonald that he ought to contact the U.S. regarding Fenian hostility to Canadian troops.

[LAC, John A, Macdonald Correspondence May, 1870, MIKAN no. 529915.]

In Assiniboia:

21 April: The Legislative Assembly of Assiniboia Law Committee meets.

There is a cold, raw rain.

Canadian rumours circulate, alleging: no U.S. mail arrived; Cavalier at Pembina says the roads are bad to Fort Abercrombie; the flag story has proved popular, in it,  [President] Louis Riel is being portrayed positively and J.E. Norbert Gay is said to have challenged [Hon.] William Bernard O’Donoghue to a fight and to have sworn that O’Donoghue ought to hang; men from Upper Fort Garry took John C. Schultz’s flagpole to raise the Provisional Government flag at Dr. William Cowan‘s house (in Upper Fort Garry) under the protection of the Union Jack; J.C. Kennedy (gunsmith at the Town of Winnipeg), is making a seal for the Provisional Government; the Lower Settlement is being troublesome and a guard was sent there; there has been a meeting of the legislative assembly’s committee.

22 April: the weather is “beautiful” and the river level is up.

the New Nation (22 April 1870), reports: on the Legislative Assembly of Assiniboia Bills (page 3); the letters of Charles Mair; the U.S. railway; “Indians Below”; plans for the Queen’s Birthday; high water; the influence of women.

Canadian rumours circulate, alleging: the Union Jack is still up at Upper Fort Garry, the new pole is not up yet; there has been a meeting of the legislative assembly committee; Capt. Adam Clark Webb/ Webbe and Colin Hamilton went to Portage la Prairie to pay off Canadian Volunteer Militia accounts; the Settlement is quiet; the HBC stores are not open yet;  [President] Louis Riel demanded HBC wheat.

In Canada:

22 April: Charges are dropped against the Red River delegates in Ottawa.

In the U.S.:

22 April: In Washington, Zachariah Chandler (who was working with United States Senator Alexander Ramsey of Minnesota) introduces a resolution into the Senate requesting that the President, Ulysses S. Grant, appoint two commissioners to negotiate with “the people of Winnipeg” for annexation to United States.

In Assiniboia:

23 April: The Legislative Assembly of Assiniboia Law Committee meets.

The weather is fine but there is wind and the level of the river is up.

Canadian rumours circulate, alleging: there was a legislative assembl committee meeting; Henry McKenney‘s schooner sailed to Upper Fort Garry from Lower Fort Garry with saw mill machinery aboard that he is moving from Lake Winnipeg to Pembina; John C. Schultz is “not 100 miles from Upper Fort Garry”; the new pole is up in the fort as is the Provisional Government flag — now higher than the Union Jack; the U.S. mail went out.

[Begg, Red River Journal, 361.]

24 April: the weather is warm and the river level is up.

William Marshall arrives at Red River Settlement with an entourage that includes Nathaniel Pitt Langford, the brother-in-law of James Wickes Taylor. They remain at the settlement for five days. During that time, Marshall and members of his party meet with a number of residents, including American Vice-Consul Henry Martin Robinson, and Hon. William B. O’Donoghue (Treasurer of the Provisional Government of Assiniboia). Marshall also enjoys “a long interview” with President Louis Riel.

Canadian rumours circulate, alleging: Bishop Alexandre-Antonin Taché gave an English sermon at the Roman Catholic school [St. Mary’s] at the Town of Winnipeg; the Provisional Government flag is up, the Union Jack is down — its rope was cut and [President] Louis Riel was furious, but nevertheless seems to be in accord with [Hon.] William B. O’Donoghue, who has not been charged as guilty; William Marshall and others arrived with Bottineau from St. Paul MN, on business connected with the Northern Pacific Railway.

25 April: the weather is warm.

Canadian rumours circulate, alleging: the Union Jack is not up at Upper Fort Garry, while the Provisional Government flag is up; the Settlement guard was sent to lower Red River, where it met with “savages”; U.S. soldiers are stationed near Pembina to guard the frontier; 400 filibusters [free booters] are on the way to Red River (but, are probably heading to St. Joseph); the legislative assembly’s committee met for the last time and the “Council” will meet tomorrow; John C. Schultz is at St. Paul MN; Walter Robert Bown is somewhere in interior.

[Begg, Red River Journal, 363.]

26 April: The Legislative Assembly of Assiniboia Law Committee meets to 4 pm. Second session of the Legislative Assembly of Assiniboia then opens and reads the Law Committee Report.

The weather is warm, the river is up, creeks are near impassable.

Canadian rumours circulate, alleging: the “Parliament of Red River” met and the flag issue was raised, at which point [President] Louis Riel pledged that the guilty vandals at Upper Fort Garry would be dismissed; William Marshall says there will be rail service to Pembina “immediately”; George Emmerling and Donaldson are back from Pembina where they were engaged in land speculation; “a few” say that the missing U.S. mails were burned at Upper Fort Garry.

In Canada:

26 April: TheRed River delegates to Ottawa are informed, “Sir John A. Macdonald and the Hon. Sir George Etienne Cartier have been authorized to negotiate with you on the subject of your mission and will be ready to receive you at 11:00,” and their negotiations finally begin.

27 April: Delegate N.J. Ritchot sends telegram to the Secretary of State for the Provisional Government of Assiniboia, Thomas Bunn, informing him, “Negotiations going on. We are doing our best. Some points are settled. The rest under discussion.”

In Assiniboia:

27 April: Session 2, Day 2 of the Debates of Legislative Assembly of Assiniboia: the Laws are sent to the printer; reports from Parish Committees on the Hay Privilege are laid before the house.

The weather is warm, but windy.

Canadian rumours circulate, alleging: International pilot Larocque says there are 5 bags of mail for Red River still at Georgetown; the legislative assembly is meeting; there is much ado about “Indian scares”; there is no news on American filibusters heading to Pembina; the Union Jack went up at Upper Fort Garry when the rope got fixed; there is anxiety in the Settlement that there has been no news from the delegates at Ottawa; a special messenger has been sent to St. Paul MN to get news of the delegates.

[Begg, Red River Journal, 364.]

28 April: Session 2, Day 3 of the Debates of Legislative Assembly of Assiniboia: the Laws are considered “article by article.”

The weather is warm, the river level is down.

Canadian rumours circulate, alleging: both flags are flying at Upper Fort Garry; Elzear Goulét was discharged from service in the Guard by[President] Louis Riel; the river pilot, Larocque, says there are 8 bags of mail for Red River still at Georgetown: the legislative assembly is in session: J.E. Norbert Gay is in command at Upper Fort Garry; no U.S. mail has arrived; the HBC is open for business; the International will run next week; HBC Gov. William Mactavish‘s health is improving.

[Begg, Red River Journal, 364.]

29 April: Session 2, Day 4 of the Debates of Legislative Assembly of Assiniboia: the Laws are considered “article by article.”

The weather is warm, the river level is down.

The New Nation (29 April 1870), reports on: the President’s Speech on the Hay Privilege: the debates of the Legislative Assembly of Assiniboia, Session 2 (26 Apr.), 2; William Marshall‘s meeting with President Louis Riel: French anger over the letters of Charles Mair; the lyrics of a French song about William McDougallJames McKay and Robert Tait denying claims made by  John Stoughton Dennis about their allegiances; smallpox on the plains; the river is open for navigation; a fire at Fiddler’s in St. James: advice to boys.

[See also “Songs of the Resistance,” this site.]

Canadian rumours circulate, alleging: the legislative assembly is in session; [President] Louis Riel is not in favour of having [Chief Justice] James Ross on the Executive Council/ Cabinet, but does want [Hon.] Andrew G.B. Bannatyne; a large U.S. mail came in: William Marshall is leaving: Capt. Adam Clark Webb/ Webbe and Hart left for Canada: both flags are flying at Upper Fort Garry: Katherine Jane Glen Macaulay Rae Hamilton Begg flew a shawl and the guards from Upper Fort Garry came by to inspect it: there is smallpox among ‘the Indians’ and the Provisional government ought to prevent them from trading robes.

[Begg, Red River Journal, 365.]

30 April: Session 2, Day 5 of the Debates of Legislative Assembly of Assiniboia: the Laws are considered “article by article.”

The weather is warm.

Canadian rumours circulate, alleging: the legislative assembly is in session: the U.S. mail went out; a body of a man was found in the river — perhaps  Thomas Scott‘s; Canadians who  left Red River took the “blood of Scott” with them on their handkerchiefs and the son of Rev. George Young [a Canadian Methodist missionary at Winnipeg] showed vials of Scott’s blood around the cars of trains that he rode to Canada.

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